a new kind of science

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New Kind Of Science

Author : Stephen Wolfram
ISBN : 1579550193
Genre : Science
File Size : 80. 41 MB
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A New Kind Of Science

Author : Stephen Wolfram
ISBN : 071399116X
Genre : Cellular automata
File Size : 74. 19 MB
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This work presents a series of dramatic discoveries never before made public. Starting from a collection of simple computer experiments---illustrated in the book by striking computer graphics---Wolfram shows how their unexpected results force a whole new way of looking at the operation of our universe. Wolfram uses his approach to tackle a remarkable array of fundamental problems in science: from the origin of the Second Law of thermodynamics, to the development of complexity in biology, the computational limitations of mathematics, the possibility of a truly fundamental theory of physics, and the interplay between free will and determinism.

New Kind Of Science

Author : Stephen Wolfram
ISBN : 0140239227
Genre :
File Size : 59. 19 MB
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Irreducibility And Computational Equivalence

Author : Hector Zenil
ISBN : 9783642354823
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 83. 7 MB
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It is clear that computation is playing an increasingly prominent role in the development of mathematics, as well as in the natural and social sciences. The work of Stephen Wolfram over the last several decades has been a salient part in this phenomenon helping founding the field of Complex Systems, with many of his constructs and ideas incorporated in his book A New Kind of Science (ANKS) becoming part of the scientific discourse and general academic knowledge--from the now established Elementary Cellular Automata to the unconventional concept of mining the Computational Universe, from today's widespread Wolfram's Behavioural Classification to his principles of Irreducibility and Computational Equivalence. This volume, with a Foreword by Gregory Chaitin and an Afterword by Cris Calude, covers these and other topics related to or motivated by Wolfram's seminal ideas, reporting on research undertaken in the decade following the publication of Wolfram's NKS book. Featuring 39 authors, its 23 contributions are organized into seven parts: Mechanisms in Programs & Nature Systems Based on Numbers & Simple Programs Social and Biological Systems & Technology Fundamental Physics The Behavior of Systems & the Notion of Computation Irreducibility & Computational Equivalence Reflections and Philosophical Implications.

Why Society Is A Complex Matter

Author : Philip Ball
ISBN : 9783642290008
Genre : Science
File Size : 27. 4 MB
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Society is complicated. But this book argues that this does not place it beyond the reach of a science that can help to explain and perhaps even to predict social behaviour. As a system made up of many interacting agents – people, groups, institutions and governments, as well as physical and technological structures such as roads and computer networks – society can be regarded as a complex system. In recent years, scientists have made great progress in understanding how such complex systems operate, ranging from animal populations to earthquakes and weather. These systems show behaviours that cannot be predicted or intuited by focusing on the individual components, but which emerge spontaneously as a consequence of their interactions: they are said to be ‘self-organized’. Attempts to direct or manage such emergent properties generally reveal that ‘top-down’ approaches, which try to dictate a particular outcome, are ineffectual, and that what is needed instead is a ‘bottom-up’ approach that aims to guide self-organization towards desirable states. This book shows how some of these ideas from the science of complexity can be applied to the study and management of social phenomena, including traffic flow, economic markets, opinion formation and the growth and structure of cities. Building on these successes, the book argues that the complex-systems view of the social sciences has now matured sufficiently for it to be possible, desirable and perhaps essential to attempt a grander objective: to integrate these efforts into a unified scheme for studying, understanding and ultimately predicting what happens in the world we have made. Such a scheme would require the mobilization and collaboration of many different research communities, and would allow society and its interactions with the physical environment to be explored through realistic models and large-scale data collection and analysis. It should enable us to find new and effective solutions to major global problems such as conflict, disease, financial instability, environmental despoliation and poverty, while avoiding unintended policy consequences. It could give us the foresight to anticipate and ameliorate crises, and to begin tackling some of the most intractable problems of the twenty-first century.

A Nonlinear Dynamics Perspective Of Wolfram S New Kind Of Science

Author : Leon O. Chua
ISBN : 9814390518
Genre : Mathematics
File Size : 76. 69 MB
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When not immersed in science, he relaxes by searching for Wagner's leitmotifs, musing over Kandinsky's chaos, and contemplating Wittgenstein's inner thoughts.This penultimate volume contains numerous original, elegant, and surprising results in 1-dimensional cellular automata. Perhaps the most exciting, if not shocking, new result is the discovery that only 82 local rules, out of 256, suffice to predict the time evolution of any of the remaining 174 local rules from an arbitrary initial bit-string configuration. This is contrary to the well-known folklore that 256 local rules are necessary, leading to the new concept of quasi-global equivalence.Another surprising result is the introduction of a simple, yet explicit, infinite bit string called the super string S, which contains all random bit strings of finite length as sub-strings. As an illustration of the mathematical subtlety of this amazing discrete testing signal, the super string S is used to prove mathematically, in a trivial and transparent way, that rule 170 is as chaotic as a coin toss.Yet another unexpected new result, among many others, is the derivation of an explicit basin tree generation formula which provides an analytical relationship between the basin trees of globally-equivalent local rules. This formula allows the symbolic, rather than numerical, generation of the time evolution of any local rule corresponding to any initial bit-string configuration, from one of the 88 globally-equivalent local rules.But perhaps the most provocative idea is the proposal for adopting rule 137, over its three globally-equivalent siblings, including the heretofore more well-known rule 110, as the prototypical universal Turing machine.

Reinventing Discovery

Author : Michael Nielsen
ISBN : 9780691148908
Genre : Computers
File Size : 61. 10 MB
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"Reinventing Discovery argues that we are in the early days of the most dramatic change in how science is done in more than 300 years. This change is being driven by new online tools, which are transforming and radically accelerating scientific discovery"--Provided by publisher.

Mind At Light Speed

Author : D. D. Nolte
ISBN : 9780743205016
Genre : Computers
File Size : 86. 26 MB
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Explains the technology and scientific principles behind the bandwidth revolution and provides an incisive look at the next generation of computers, the future of artificial intelligence, and their implications for human life.

The Metaphysics Of Science

Author : Craig Dilworth
ISBN : 9789401586214
Genre : Science
File Size : 62. 10 MB
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The roots of this work lie in my earlier book, Scientific Progress, which first appeared in 1981. One of its topics, the distinction between scientific laws and theories, is there treated with reference to the same distinction as drawn by N. R. Campbell in his Physics: The Elements. Shortly after completing Scientific Progress, I read Rom Harre's The Principles of Scientific Thinking, in which the concept of theory is even more clearly delineated than in Campbell, being directly con nected to the notion of a model - as it was in my book. In subsequent considerations regarding science, Harre's work thus became my main source of inspiration with regard to theories, while Campbell's re mained my main source with respect to empiricallaws. Around the same time I also read William Whewell's Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences. In this work, Whewell depicts principles as playing a central role in the formation of science, and conceives of them in much the same way as Kant conceives of fundamental syn thetic a priori judgements. The idea that science should have principles as a basic element immediately made sense to me, and from that time I have thought of science in terms of laws, theories and principles.

The Structure Of Scientific Revolutions

Author : Thomas S. Kuhn
ISBN : 9780226458144
Genre : Science
File Size : 40. 36 MB
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A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

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