americans first chinese americans and the second world war

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Americans First

Author : Kevin Scott Wong
ISBN : 9780674045316
Genre : History
File Size : 26. 46 MB
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World War II was a watershed event for many of America's minorities, but its impact on Chinese Americans has been largely ignored. Utilizing extensive archival research as well as oral histories and letters from over one hundred informants, Wong explores how Chinese Americans carved a newly respected and secure place for themselves in American society during the war years.

Americans First

Author : Kevin Scott Wong
ISBN : 1592138403
Genre : History
File Size : 77. 62 MB
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During the Second World War, Chinese Americans contributed to the war effort by joining the armed forces and working in the defense industries. In doing so, they improved their social status, often at the expense of Japanese Americans, and positioned themselves to become the "model minority" and the "good Asian in the good war." In Americans First, K. Scott Wong uses archival research and oral histories to provide the first detailed account of Chinese Americans in the American military. Wong traces the history of the 14th Air Service Group, a segregated outfit of Chinese Americans sent to China in support of the American Army Air Corps and the Chinese Air Force. His ethnic history of inclusion shows how this new generation of Chinese Americans was more socially accepted, moving from the margins of society into the American mainstream during a time of pervasive racism.

Americans First

Author : Kevin Scott Wong
ISBN : 0674016718
Genre : History
File Size : 75. 23 MB
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World War II was a watershed event for many of America's minorities, but its impact on Chinese Americans has been largely ignored. Utilizing extensive archival research as well as oral histories and letters from over one hundred informants, Wong explores how Chinese Americans carved a newly respected and secure place for themselves in American society during the war years.

The Adventures Of Eddie Fung

Author : Judy Yung
ISBN : 9780295802053
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 22. 78 MB
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Eddie Fung has the distinction of being the only Chinese American soldier to be captured by the Japanese during World War II. He was then put to work on the Burma-Siam railroad, made famous by the film The Bridge on the River Kwai. In this moving and unforgettable memoir, Eddie recalls how he, a second-generation Chinese American born and raised in San Francisco's Chinatown, reinvented himself as a Texas cowboy before going overseas with the U.S. Army. On the way to the Philippines, his battalion was captured by the Japanese in Java and sent to Burma to undertake the impossible task of building a railroad through 262 miles of tropical jungle. Working under brutal slave labor conditions, the men completed the railroad in fourteen months, at the cost of 12,500 POW and 70,000 Asian lives. Eddie lived to tell how his background helped him endure forty-two months of humiliation and cruelty and how his experiences as the sole Chinese American member of the most decorated Texan unit of any war shaped his later life.

Fighting For The Dream

Author : Victoria Moy
ISBN : 0930377052
Genre : Chinese American veterans
File Size : 41. 51 MB
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Fighting for the Dream is a collection of oral histories of 40 Chinese American men and women-ages 24 to 94-who served in wars from World War II to conflicts in Afghanistan. These individuals defied boundaries, went against their cultural grain, and changed history. Through their personal stories, we see a greater tapestry that is the story of America in the last hundred years. This collection includes interviews with the first Asian American general (John Fugh), the first Asian American Assistant Secretary of Defense for Force Management Policy (Frederick Pang), the first Asian American full unrestricted Marine (Kurt Lee), the first Asian American National Commander of the American Legion (Fang Wong), the first Asian American judge in New York State (Randall Eng), as well as some of the 20,000 Chinese Americans - a quarter of the Chinese American population at the time - who served during World War II. This collection also features the stories of: World War II veterans Genson Lum, Peter Woo, Kay Wong Chin, Dr. Wing Mar, Al Chinn, Earl Jung, Tom Wah Sun Lew, Mack Pong, Sam Jue, Richard Y.W. Chin, Richard Goon, Lester Fong, Elsie Seetoo, Wayne H. Wong Korean War veterans Kurt Lee, Rita K. Chow Vietnam War veterans John Gerald Miki, David J. Louie, Gabe Mui, Richard Wong, Thomas Wing Persian Gulf War veterans Tony Lee, Mimi Wang Iraq & Afghanistan veterans Chi Szeto, Pakee Fang, Michael Chan, See-wan Szeto, Welton Chang, Wilem Wong, Cindy Wu, Howard Chin, Cliff Chen, Juliet Shum, Mo Pan, Astrid Szeto, William Chan

Remaking Chinese America

Author : Xiaojian Zhao
ISBN : 0813530113
Genre : History
File Size : 69. 99 MB
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In Remaking Chinese America, Xiaojian Zhao explores the myriad forces that changed and unified Chinese Americans during a key period in American history. Prior to 1940, this immigrant community was predominantly male, but between 1940 and 1965 it was transformed into a family-centered American ethnic community. Zhao pays special attention to forces both inside and outside of the country in order to explain these changing demographics. She scrutinizes the repealed exclusion laws and the immigration laws enacted after 1940. Careful attention is also paid to evolving gender roles, since women constituted the majority of newcomers, significantly changing the sex ratio of the Chinese American population. As members of a minority sharing a common cultural heritage as well as pressures from the larger society, Chinese Americans networked and struggled to gain equal rights during the cold war period. In defining the political circumstances that brought the Chinese together as a cohesive political body, Zhao also delves into the complexities they faced when questioning their personal national allegiances. Remaking Chinese America uses a wealth of primary sources, including oral histories, newspapers, genealogical documents, and immigration files to illuminate what it was like to be Chinese living in the United States during a period that--until now--has been little studied.

Chinese Americans The History And Culture Of A People

Author : Jonathan H. X. Lee
ISBN : 9781610695503
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77. 35 MB
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This in-depth historical analysis highlights the enormous contributions of Chinese Americans to the professions, politics, and popular culture of America, from the 19th century through the present day. • Highlights the distinctive roles that Chinese Americans have added to the fabric of American life • Illustrates the experience of Chinese Americans with discrimination, resistance, and assimilation • Considers the émigrés of the Sinophone diaspora with entries on Cambodian-Chinese and Vietnamese-Chinese Americans • Offers a selection of fascinating primary documents that enrich the reader's experience • Reveals the problems that Chinese American women faced with the passage of the 1882 Exclusion Act

The Color Of Success

Author : Ellen D. Wu
ISBN : 9781400848874
Genre : History
File Size : 58. 72 MB
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The Color of Success tells of the astonishing transformation of Asians in the United States from the "yellow peril" to "model minorities"--peoples distinct from the white majority but lauded as well-assimilated, upwardly mobile, and exemplars of traditional family values--in the middle decades of the twentieth century. As Ellen Wu shows, liberals argued for the acceptance of these immigrant communities into the national fold, charging that the failure of America to live in accordance with its democratic ideals endangered the country's aspirations to world leadership. Weaving together myriad perspectives, Wu provides an unprecedented view of racial reform and the contradictions of national belonging in the civil rights era. She highlights the contests for power and authority within Japanese and Chinese America alongside the designs of those external to these populations, including government officials, social scientists, journalists, and others. And she demonstrates that the invention of the model minority took place in multiple arenas, such as battles over zoot suiters leaving wartime internment camps, the juvenile delinquency panic of the 1950s, Hawaii statehood, and the African American freedom movement. Together, these illuminate the impact of foreign relations on the domestic racial order and how the nation accepted Asians as legitimate citizens while continuing to perceive them as indelible outsiders. By charting the emergence of the model minority stereotype, The Color of Success reveals that this far-reaching, politically charged process continues to have profound implications for how Americans understand race, opportunity, and nationhood.

Asian Americans An Encyclopedia Of Social Cultural Economic And Political History 3 Volumes

Author : Xiaojian Zhao
ISBN : 9781598842401
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 49. 1 MB
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This is the most comprehensive and up-to-date reference work on Asian Americans, comprising three volumes that address a broad range of topics on various Asian and Pacific Islander American groups from 1848 to the present day. • Presents information on Asian Americans and individual Asian ethnic groups that provides comprehensive overviews of the respective groups • Includes special topic entries that contain source information regarding major historical events • Comprises work from a truly outstanding list of contributors that include scholars, journalists, writers, community activists, graduate students, and other specialists • Expands the boundaries of Asian American studies through innovative entries that address transnationalism, gender and sexuality, and inter- and cross-disciplinarity

Forgotten Ally

Author : Rana Mitter
ISBN : 9780547840567
Genre : History
File Size : 22. 61 MB
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An Economist Book of the Year A Financial Times Book of the Year “A book that has long cried out to be written.” — Observer (UK), Books of the Year In 1937, two years before Hitler invaded Poland, Chinese troops clashed with Japanese occupiers in the first battle of World War II. Joining with the United States, the Soviet Union, and Great Britain, China became the fourth great ally in a devastating struggle for its very survival. Prizewinning historian Rana Mitter unfurls China’s drama of invasion, resistance, slaughter, and political intrigue as never before. Based on groundbreaking research, this gripping narrative focuses on a handful of unforgettable characters, including Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Zedong, and Chiang’s American chief of staff, “Vinegar Joe” Stilwell. Mitter also recounts the sacrifice and resilience of everyday Chinese people through the horrors of bombings, famines, and the infamous Rape of Nanking. More than any other twentieth-century event, World War II was crucial in shaping China’s worldview, making Forgotten Ally both a definitive work of history and an indispensable guide to today’s China and its relationship with the West. “In the manner of David McCullough, [Mitter] creates a complex history that is urgently alive.” — Kirkus Reviews

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