appalachia in the making the mountain south in the nineteenth century children of poverty

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Appalachia In The Making

Author : Mary Beth Pudup
ISBN : 9780807888964
Genre : History
File Size : 63. 44 MB
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Appalachia first entered the American consciousness as a distinct region in the decades following the Civil War. The place and its people have long been seen as backwards and 'other' because of their perceived geographical, social, and economic isolation. These essays, by fourteen eminent historians and social scientists, illuminate important dimensions of early social life in diverse sections of the Appalachian mountains. The contributors seek to place the study of Appalachia within the context of comparative regional studies of the United States, maintaining that processes and patterns thought to make the region exceptional were not necessarily unique to the mountain South. The contributors are Mary K. Anglin, Alan Banks, Dwight B. Billings, Kathleen M. Blee, Wilma A. Dunaway, John R. Finger, John C. Inscoe, Ronald L. Lewis, Ralph Mann, Gordon B. McKinney, Mary Beth Pudup, Paul Salstrom, Altina L. Waller, and John Alexander Williams

The Road To Poverty

Author : Dwight B. Billings
ISBN : 0521655463
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 31. 8 MB
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Intended for social scientists, historians, and readers interested in social change and social poverty, this book examines the roots of entrenched poverty in Appalachia. It is both a social history of the creation of chronic poverty (and wealth) in Clay County, KY and an explication of how economic markets, cultural strategies, and the state interact to shape local society. By linking a longitudinal study of a single place to broader understandings of the historical development of the capitalist world system, this book contributes to policy discussions of the underlying causes of persistent rural poverty and reasons for the chronic failure of governmental programs to alleviate such poverty. In doing this study the authors have assembled probably the longest running set of longitudinal data currently available on an American rural population as well as the most extensive body of data available for a persistently poor community in the United States.

Southern Migrants Northern Exiles

Author : Chad Berry
ISBN : 0252068416
Genre : History
File Size : 21. 55 MB
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One of the largest internal migrations in U.S. history, the great white migration left its mark on virtually every family in every southern upland and flatland town. In this extraordinary record of ordinary lives, dozens of white southern migrants describe their experiences in the northern ""wilderness"" and their irradicable attachments to family and community in the South. Southern out-migration drew millions of southern workers to the steel mills, automobile factories, and even agricultural fields and orchards of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and Illinois. Through vivid oral histories, Chad Berry explores the conflict between migrants' economic success and their ""spiritual exile"" in the North. He documents the tension between factory owners who welcomed cheap, naive southern laborers and local ""native"" workers who greeted migrants with suspicion and hostility. He examines the phenomenon of ""shuttle migration,"" in which migrants came north to work during the winter and returned home to plant spring crops on their southern farms. He also explores the impact of southern traditions - especially the southern evangelical church and ""hillbilly"" music - brought north by migrants.Berry argues that in spite of being scorned by midwesterners for violence, fecundity, intoxication, laziness, and squalor, the vast majority of southern whites who moved to the Midwest found the economic prosperity they were seeking. By allowing southern migrants to assess their own experiences and tell their own stories, Southern Migrants, Northern Exiles refutes persistent stereotypes about migrants' clannishness, life-style, work ethic, and success in the North.

Textile Art From Southern Appalachia

Author : Kathleen Curtis Wilson
ISBN : 157072198X
Genre : Crafts & Hobbies
File Size : 38. 31 MB
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Features forty-four coverlets and two quilts made by hand weavers who lived in Western North Carolina, Eastern Kentucky, East Tennessee, and Southwest Virginia. Ms. Wilson has spent many years researching southern Appalachian overshot coverlet weaving.

Writing In The Kitchen

Author : David A. Davis
ISBN : 9781626742109
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 28. 8 MB
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Scarlett O’Hara munched on a radish and vowed never to go hungry again. Vardaman Bundren ate bananas in Faulkner’s Jefferson, and the Invisible Man dined on a sweet potato in Harlem. Although food and stories may be two of the most prominent cultural products associated with the South, the connections between them have not been thoroughly explored until now. Southern food has become the subject of increasingly self-conscious intellectual consideration. The Southern Foodways Alliance, the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, food-themed issues of Oxford American and Southern Cultures, and a spate of new scholarly and popular books demonstrate this interest. Writing in the Kitchen explores the relationship between food and literature and makes a major contribution to the study of both southern literature and of southern foodways and culture more widely. This collection examines food writing in a range of literary expressions, including cookbooks, agricultural journals, novels, stories, and poems. Contributors interpret how authors use food to explore the changing South, considering the ways race, ethnicity, class, gender, and region affect how and what people eat. They describe foods from specific southern places such as New Orleans and Appalachia, engage both the historical and contemporary South, and study the food traditions of ethnicities as they manifest through the written word.

American Anthropologist

Author :
ISBN : UCAL:C3285755
Genre : Anthropology
File Size : 51. 16 MB
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American Anthropologist Journal Vol 104 No 2 June 2002

Author : AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION
ISBN :
Genre :
File Size : 88. 71 MB
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The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author : Melissa Walker
ISBN : 9781469616681
Genre : Reference
File Size : 43. 26 MB
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Volume 11 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture examines the economic culture of the South by pairing two categories that account for the ways many southerners have made their living. In the antebellum period, the wealth of southern whites came largely from agriculture that relied on the forced labor of enslaved blacks. After Reconstruction, the South became attractive to new industries lured by the region's ongoing commitment to low-wage labor and management-friendly economic policies. Throughout the volume, articles reflect the breadth and variety of southern life, paying particular attention to the region's profound economic transformation in recent decades. The agricultural section consists of 25 thematic entries that explore issues such as Native American agricultural practices, plantations, and sustainable agriculture. Thirty-eight shorter pieces cover key crops of the region--from tobacco to Christmas trees--as well as issues of historic and emerging interest--from insects and insecticides to migrant labor. The section on industry and commerce contains 13 thematic entries in which contributors address topics such as the economic impact of military bases, resistance to industrialization, and black business. Thirty-six topical entries explore particular industries, such as textiles, timber, automobiles, and banking, as well as individuals--including Henry W. Grady and Sam M. Walton--whose ideas and enterprises have helped shape the modern South.

Hillbilly Elegie

Author : J. D. Vance
ISBN : 9783843715775
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 30. 11 MB
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Seine Großeltern versuchten, mit Fleiß und Mobilität der Armut zu entkommen und sich in der Mitte der Gesellschaft zu etablieren. Doch letztlich war alles vergeblich. J. D. Vance erzählt die Geschichte seiner Familie — eine Geschichte vom Scheitern und von der Resignation einer ganzen Bevölkerungsschicht. Armut und Chaos, Hilflosigkeit und Gewalt, Drogen und Alkohol: Genau in diesem Teufelskreis befinden sich viele weiße Arbeiterfamilien in den USA — entfremdet von der politischen Führung, abgehängt vom Rest der Gesellschaft, anfällig für populistische Parolen. Früher konnten sich die »Hillbillys«, die weißen Fabrikarbeiter, erhoffen, sich zu Wohlstand zu schuften. Doch spätestens gegen Ende des 20sten Jahrhunderts zog der Niedergang der alten Industrien ihre Familien in eine Abwärtsspirale, in der sie bis heute stecken. Vance gelingt es wie keinem anderen, diese ausweglose Situation und die Krise einer ganzen Gesellschaft eindrücklich zu schildern. Sein Buch bewegte Millionen von Lesern in den USA und erklärt nicht zuletzt den Wahltriumph eines Donald Trump.

The Paradox Of Southern Progressivism 1880 1930

Author : William A. Link
ISBN : 0807862991
Genre : History
File Size : 85. 35 MB
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Focusing on the cultural conflicts between social reformers and southern communities, William Link presents an important reinterpretation of the origins and impact of progressivism in the South. He shows that a fundamental clash of values divided reformers and rural southerners, ultimately blocking the reforms. His book, based on extensive archival research, adds a new dimension to the study of American reform movements. The new group of social reformers that emerged near the end of the nineteenth century believed that the South, an underdeveloped and politically fragile region, was in the midst of a social crisis. They recognized the environmental causes of social problems and pushed for interventionist solutions. As a consensus grew about southern social problems in the early 1900s, reformers adopted new methods to win the support of reluctant or indifferent southerners. By the beginning of World War I, their public crusades on prohibition, health, schools, woman suffrage, and child labor had led to some new social policies and the beginnings of a bureaucratic structure. By the late 1920s, however, social reform and southern progressivism remained largely frustrated. Link's analysis of the response of rural southern communities to reform efforts establishes a new social context for southern progressivism. He argues that the movement failed because a cultural chasm divided the reformers and the communities they sought to transform. Reformers were paternalistic. They believed that the new policies should properly be administered from above, and they were not hesitant to impose their own solutions. They also viewed different cultures and races as inferior. Rural southerners saw their communities and customs quite differently. For most, local control and personal liberty were watchwords. They had long deflected attempts of southern outsiders to control their affairs, and they opposed the paternalistic reforms of the Progressive Era with equal determination. Throughout the 1920s they made effective implementation of policy changes difficult if not impossible. In a small-scale war, rural folk forced the reformers to confront the integrity of the communities they sought to change.

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