changing the subject how the women of columbia shaped the way we think about sex and politics

Download Book Changing The Subject How The Women Of Columbia Shaped The Way We Think About Sex And Politics in PDF format. You can Read Online Changing The Subject How The Women Of Columbia Shaped The Way We Think About Sex And Politics here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Changing The Subject

Author : Rosalind Rosenberg
ISBN : 9780231501149
Genre : History
File Size : 87. 17 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 540
Read : 597

Download Now


This remarkable story begins in the years following the Civil War, when reformers -- emboldened by the egalitarian rhetoric of the post--Civil War era -- pressed New York City's oldest institution of higher learning to admit women in the 1870s. Their effort failed, but within twenty years Barnard College was founded, creating a refuge for women scholars at Columbia, as well as an academic beachhead "from which women would make incursions into the larger university." By 1950, Columbia was granting more advanced degrees to women and hiring more female faculty than any other university in the country. In Changing the Subject, Rosalind Rosenberg shows how this century-long struggle transcended its local origins and contributed to the rise of modern feminism, furthered the cause of political reform, and enlivened the intellectual life of America's most cosmopolitan city. Surmounting a series of social and institutional obstacles to gain access to Columbia University, women played a key role in its evolution from a small, Protestant, male-dominated school into a renowned research university. At the same time, their struggles challenged prevailing ideas about masculinity, femininity, and sexual identity; questioned accepted views about ethnicity, race, and rights; and thereby laid the foundation for what we now know as gender. From Lillie Devereux Blake, Annie Nathan Meyer, and Virginia Crocheron Gildersleeve in the first generation, through Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, and Zora Neale Hurston in the second, to Kate Millett, Gerda Lerner, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the third, the women of Columbia shook the world.

A Lever Long Enough

Author : Robert McCaughey
ISBN : 9780231537520
Genre : History
File Size : 84. 9 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 339
Read : 706

Download Now


In this comprehensive social history of Columbia University's School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), Robert McCaughey combines archival research with oral testimony and contemporary interviews to build both a critical and celebratory portrait of one of the oldest engineering schools in the United States. McCaughey follows the evolving, occasionally rocky, and now integrated relationship between SEAS's engineers and the rest of the Columbia University student body, faculty, and administration. He also revisits the interaction between the SEAS staff and the inhabitants and institutions of the City of New York, where the school has resided since its founding in 1864. He compares the historical struggles and achievements of the school's engineers with their present-day battles and accomplishments, and he contrasts their teaching and research approaches to those of their peers at other free-standing and Ivy league engineering schools. What begins as a localized history of a school striving to define itself within a university known for its strengths in the humanities and the social sciences becomes a wider story of the transformation of the applied sciences into a critical component of American technology and education.

Jane Crow

Author : Rosalind Rosenberg
ISBN : 9780190656461
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 26. 58 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 365
Read : 202

Download Now


Throughout her prodigious life, activist and lawyer Pauli Murray systematically fought against all arbitrary distinctions in society, channeling her outrage at the discrimination she faced to make America a more democratic country. In this definitive biography, Rosalind Rosenberg offers a poignant portrait of a figure who played pivotal roles in both the modern civil rights and women's movements. A mixed-race orphan, Murray grew up in segregated North Carolina before escaping to New York, where she attended Hunter College and became a labor activist in the 1930s. When she applied to graduate school at the University of North Carolina, where her white great-great-grandfather had been a trustee, she was rejected because of her race. She went on to graduate first in her class at Howard Law School, only to be rejected for graduate study again at Harvard University this time on account of her sex. Undaunted, Murray forged a singular career in the law. In the 1950s, her legal scholarship helped Thurgood Marshall challenge segregation head-on in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case. When appointed by Eleanor Roosevelt to the President's Commission on the Status of Women in 1962, she advanced the idea of Jane Crow, arguing that the same reasons used to condemn race discrimination could be used to battle gender discrimination. In 1965, she became the first African American to earn a JSD from Yale Law School and the following year persuaded Betty Friedan to found an NAACP for women, which became NOW. In the early 1970s, Murray provided Ruth Bader Ginsburg with the argument Ginsburg used to persuade the Supreme Court that the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution protects not only blacks but also women - and potentially other minority groups - from discrimination. By that time, Murray was a tenured history professor at Brandeis, a position she left to become the first black woman ordained a priest by the Episcopal Church in 1976. Murray accomplished all this while struggling with issues of identity. She believed from childhood she was male and tried unsuccessfully to persuade doctors to give her testosterone. While she would today be identified as transgender, during her lifetime no social movement existed to support this identity. She ultimately used her private feelings of being "in-between" to publicly contend that identities are not fixed, an idea that has powered campaigns for equal rights in the United States for the past half-century.

Book Review Digest

Author :
ISBN : UOM:39015066156806
Genre : Bibliography
File Size : 84. 36 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 951
Read : 231

Download Now



Divided Lives

Author : Rosalind Rosenberg
ISBN : 0809016311
Genre : History
File Size : 86. 17 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 384
Read : 225

Download Now


In this lively and informed exploration of women's lives in the larger context of U.S. social and political history, Rosalind Rosenberg shows how American traditions of federalism, racial and ethnic diversity, geographic mobility, and relative abundance have both aided and hindered women's strides toward equality.

Feminist Collections

Author :
ISBN : UOM:49015003137248
Genre : Women's studies
File Size : 27. 40 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 959
Read : 722

Download Now



Top Download:

Best Books