diploma of whiteness race and social policy in brazil 1917 1945

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Diploma Of Whiteness

Author : Jerry Dávila
ISBN : 9780822384441
Genre : Education
File Size : 68. 1 MB
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In Brazil, the country with the largest population of African descent in the Americas, the idea of race underwent a dramatic shift in the first half of the twentieth century. Brazilian authorities, who had considered race a biological fact, began to view it as a cultural and environmental condition. Jerry Dávila explores the significance of this transition by looking at the history of the Rio de Janeiro school system between 1917 and 1945. He demonstrates how, in the period between the world wars, the dramatic proliferation of social policy initiatives in Brazil was subtly but powerfully shaped by beliefs that racially mixed and nonwhite Brazilians could be symbolically, if not physically, whitened through changes in culture, habits, and health. Providing a unique historical perspective on how racial attitudes move from elite discourse into people’s lives, Diploma of Whiteness shows how public schools promoted the idea that whites were inherently fit and those of African or mixed ancestry were necessarily in need of remedial attention. Analyzing primary material—including school system records, teacher journals, photographs, private letters, and unpublished documents—Dávila traces the emergence of racially coded hiring practices and student-tracking policies as well as the development of a social and scientific philosophy of eugenics. He contends that the implementation of the various policies intended to “improve” nonwhites institutionalized subtle barriers to their equitable integration into Brazilian society.

Diploma Of Whiteness

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ISBN : OCLC:743402240
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DIVAsserts that Brazilian mid-century educational reforms, designed to end rigid, race-based exclusions and to incorporate the poor, did so by stressing whiteness as the primary characteristic of modernity./div

Dictatorship In South America

Author : Jerry Dávila
ISBN : 9781118290798
Genre : History
File Size : 65. 5 MB
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Dictatorship in South America explores the experiences of Brazilian, Argentine and Chilean experience under military rule. Presents a single-volume thematic study that explores experiences with dictatorship as well as their social and historical contexts in Latin America Examines at the ideological and economic crossroads that brought Argentina, Brazil and Chile under the thrall of military dictatorship Draws on recent historiographical currents from Latin America to read these regimes as radically ideological and inherently unstable Makes a close reading of the economic trajectory from dependency to development and democratization and neoliberal reform in language that is accessible to general readers Offers a lively and readable narrative that brings popular perspectives to bear on national histories Selected as a 2014 Outstanding Academic Title by CHOICE

Terms Of Inclusion

Author : Paulina L. Alberto
ISBN : 9780807877715
Genre : History
File Size : 84. 66 MB
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In this history of black thought and racial activism in twentieth-century Brazil, Paulina Alberto demonstrates that black intellectuals, and not just elite white Brazilians, shaped discourses about race relations and the cultural and political terms of inclusion in their modern nation. Drawing on a wide range of sources, including the prolific black press of the era, and focusing on the influential urban centers of Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Salvador da Bahia, Alberto traces the shifting terms that black thinkers used to negotiate their citizenship over the course of the century, offering fresh insight into the relationship between ideas of race and nation in modern Brazil. Alberto finds that black intellectuals' ways of engaging with official racial discourses changed as broader historical trends made the possibilities for true inclusion appear to flow and then recede. These distinct political strategies, Alberto argues, were nonetheless part of black thinkers' ongoing attempts to make dominant ideologies of racial harmony meaningful in light of evolving local, national, and international politics and discourse. Terms of Inclusion tells a new history of the role of people of color in shaping and contesting the racialized contours of citizenship in twentieth-century Brazil.

Hotel Tr Pico

Author : Jerry Dávila
ISBN : 9780822393443
Genre : History
File Size : 84. 34 MB
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In the wake of African decolonization, Brazil attempted to forge connections with newly independent countries. In the early 1960s it launched an effort to establish diplomatic ties with Africa; in the 1970s it undertook trade campaigns to open African markets to Brazilian technology. Hotel Trópico reveals the perceptions, particularly regarding race, of the diplomats and intellectuals who traveled to Africa on Brazil’s behalf. Jerry Dávila analyzes how their actions were shaped by ideas of Brazil as an emerging world power, ready to expand its sphere of influence; of Africa as the natural place to assert that influence, given its historical slave-trade ties to Brazil; and of twentieth-century Brazil as a “racial democracy,” a uniquely harmonious mix of races and cultures. While the experiences of Brazilian policymakers and diplomats in Africa reflected the logic of racial democracy, they also exposed ruptures in this interpretation of Brazilian identity. Did Brazil share a “lusotropical” identity with Portugal and its African colonies, so that it was bound to support Portuguese colonialism at the expense of Brazil’s ties with African nations? Or was Brazil a country of “Africans of every color,” compelled to support decolonization in its role as a natural leader in the South Atlantic? Drawing on interviews with retired Brazilian diplomats and intellectuals, Dávila shows the Brazilian belief in racial democracy to be about not only race but also Portuguese ethnicity.

For Social Peace In Brazil

Author : Barbara Weinstein
ISBN : 0807846023
Genre : History
File Size : 62. 73 MB
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"Outstanding history of Säao Paulo industrialists' attempt to modernize industry by remaking the working class. Based on a wide range of documents, the work focuses on vocational training programs sponsored by the state-chartered, but industry-run, Serviðco Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial and on the industrial social services institute, Serviðco Social da Indâustria, from 1940s-1960s. Argues that workers and industrialists converged on rationalizing project of improving workers' skills, but diverged on politics where workers followed populists and industrialists conspired for more managerial, authoritarian government. Essential contribution to history of relationships between labor, elites, and state, revising arguments such as Cardoso's that Brazilian bourgeoisie lacked a 'project.'"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Becoming Campesinos

Author : Christopher Robert Boyer
ISBN : 0804743568
Genre : History
File Size : 66. 96 MB
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Becoming Campesinos argues that the formation of the campesino as both a political category and a cultural identity in Mexico was one of the most enduring legacies of the great revolutionary upheavals that began in 1910. The author maintains that the understanding of popular-class unity conveyed by the term campesino originated in the interaction of post-revolutionary ideologies and agrarian militancy during the 1920s and 1930s. The book uses oral histories, archival documents, and partisan newspapers to trace the history of one movement born of this dynamic—agrarismo in the state of Michoacán.

The Sanitation Of Brazil

Author : Gilberto Hochman
ISBN : 9780252099052
Genre : History
File Size : 86. 30 MB
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Celebrated as a major work since its original publication, The Sanitation of Brazil traces how rural health and sanitation policies influenced the formation of Brazil's national public health system. Gilberto Hochman's pioneering study examines the ideological, social and political forces that approached questions of health and government action. The era from 1910 to 1930 offered unique opportunities for public health reform, and Hochman examines its successes and failures. He looks at how health became a state concern, tying the emergence of public health policies to a nationalistic movement and to a convergence of the elites' social consciousness with their political and material interests. Politicians weighed the costs and benefits of state-run public health versus the burdens imposed by disease. Physicians and intellectuals, meanwhile, swayed them with warnings that endemic disease and official neglect might affect everyone--rich and poor, rural and urban, interior and coastal--if left unchecked. The book shows how disease and health were and are associated with nation-state building in Brazil.

Constructing Education For Development

Author : Colette Chabbott
ISBN : 0815338295
Genre : Education
File Size : 90. 49 MB
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Song from the Land of Fire explores Azerbaijanian musical culture, a subject previously unexamined by American and European scholars. This book contains notations of mugham performance--a fusion of traditional poetry and musical improvisation--and analysis of hybrid genres, such as mugham-operas and symphonic mugham by native composers. Intimately connected to the awakening of Azerbaijanian national consciousness while ruled by the Russian Empire and the USSR, mugham is inseparable from the contexts in which it is produced and heard. Inna Naroditskaya provides the historical and political contexts for mugham and profiles the musicians, musical genealogies, and musical institutions of Azerbaijan.

Race And The Brazilian Body

Author : Jennifer Roth-Gordon
ISBN : 9780520293809
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 67. 49 MB
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"Based on the spontaneous conversations of shantytown youth hanging out on the streets of their neighborhoods and interviews from the comfortable living rooms of the middle class, Race and the Brazilian Body asks how racial ideas about the superiority of whiteness and the inferiority of blackness continue to play out in the daily lives of Rio de Janeiro's residents. This ethnographic account describes how cariocas (Rio residents) "read" the body for racial signs, looking beyond phenotype to pay careful attention to cultural and linguistic practices, including the use of nonstandard speech commonly described as slang (gairia)"--Provided by publisher.

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