encyclopedia of electronic components volume 3 sensors for location presence proximity orientation oscillation force load human input liquid light heat sound and electricity

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Encyclopedia Of Electronic Components Volume 3

Author : Charles Platt
ISBN : 9781449334277
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 85. 55 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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Want to know how to use an electronic component? This third book of a three-volume set includes key information on electronics parts for your projects--complete with photographs, schematics, and diagrams. You'll learn what each one does, how it works, why it's useful, and what variants exist. No matter how much you know about electronics, you'll find fascinating details you've never come across before. Perfect for teachers, hobbyists, engineers, and students of all ages, this reference puts reliable, fact-checked information right at your fingertips--whether you're refreshing your memory or exploring a component for the first time. Beginners will quickly grasp important concepts, and more experienced users will find the specific details their projects require. Volume 3 covers components for sensing the physical world, including light, sound, heat, motion, ambient, and electrical sensors. Unique: the first and only encyclopedia set on electronic components, distilled into three separate volumes Incredibly detailed: includes information distilled from hundreds of sources Easy to browse: parts are clearly organized by component type Authoritative: fact-checked by expert advisors to ensure that the information is both current and accurate Reliable: a more consistent source of information than online sources, product datasheets, and manufacturer's tutorials Instructive: each component description provides details about substitutions, common problems, and workarounds Comprehensive: Volume 1 covers power, electromagnetism, and discrete semi-conductors; Volume 2 includes integrated circuits, and light and sound sources; Volume 3 covers a range of sensing devices.

Encyclopedia Of Electronic Components Volume 1

Author : Charles Platt
ISBN : 9781449333898
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 41. 58 MB
Format : PDF
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Provides information about components, including batteries, capacitors, diodes, and switches.

Encyclopedia Of Electronic Components Vol 3 Charles Platt Fredrik Jansson 2016

Author : Maker Media Publishing
ISBN : 9781449334314
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 20. 39 MB
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This third and final volume of the Encyclopedia of Electronic Components is devoted entirely to sensors. Two factors have caused very significant changes in the field of sensors since the 1980s. First, features such as antilock braking, airbags, and emissions controls stimulated the development of low-priced sensors for automotive applications. Many of these sensors were fabricated in silicon as MEMS (microelectromechanical) devices. The second wave began in 2007 when MEMS sensors were installed in the iPhone. A modern phone may contain almost a dozen different types of sensors, and their size and price have been driven down to a point that would have been unimaginable 20 years previously. Many MEMS sensors are now as cheap as basic semiconductor components such as a voltage regulator or a logic chip, and they are easy to use in conjunction with microcontrollers. In this Encyclopedia, we have allocated significant space to this segment of the market, hoping that the specific products that we have chosen will remain popular and available for at least the next decade. In addition, we have devoted space to older components where durability has been proven. Purpose While much of the information in this volume can be found dispersed among datasheets, introductory texts, Internet sites, and technical briefings published by manufacturers, we believe there is a real need for a durable resource that assembles all the relevant data in one place, properly organized and verified, including details that may be hard to find elsewhere. This volume may also serve a useful purpose by attempting to categorize and classify components in a field that is remarkably chaotic. For example, is an object presence sensor different from a proximity sensor? Some manufacturers seem to think so; others disagree. Understanding the distinctions and the underlying principles can be important if you are trying to decide which sensor to use. Sensor terminology can also be confusing. To take another example, what is the difference between a reflective interrupter, a reflective object sensor, a reflective optical sensor, a reflective photointerrupter, and an opt-pass sensor? These terms are used in various datasheets to describe components that are all retroreflective sensors. Understanding the proliferating variety of terminology can be essential if you simply want to find something in a product index. As in volumes 1 and 2, this volume is organized by subject. For example, if you want to measure temperature, you’ll find the entries for a thermistor and a thermocouple next to each other, in an entire section devoted to the sensing of heat. This will help you to compare capabilities and choose the component that best suits your application. The subject path leading to each sensor is shown at the top of the first page of each entry. For gas flow rate, for instance, you would follow this path: fluid > gas > flow rate Note that the word “fluid” is properly used to include gases as well as liquids. Exceptions and Conflicts Unfortunately, some sensors are not easily categorized. There are four problems in this area. 1. What Does a Sensor Really Sense? A GPS chip is a radio receiver, picking up transmissions from satellites. Does this mean it should be categorized as a sensor of radio waves? No, its purpose is to tell you your location. Therefore, it is categorized as a location sensor. This leads to the first general rule: sensors are categorized by their primary purpose. Secondary purposes may be found in the index. 2. How Many Sensors Are in a Sensor? Many surface-mount chips perform more than one sensing function. For example, an inertial measurement unit (often identified by its acronym, IMU) can contain three gyroscope sensors and three accelerometers—and may contain three magnetometers, too. How should it be categorized? The answer is that an IMU will be mentioned in more than one entry in the Encyclopedia, because it performs more than one function; but it will not have its own separate entry, because each entry in the Encyclopedia is for a single primary sensing function. The names of multisensor chips are, of course, included in the index. 3. How Many Stimuli Can One Sensor Sense? A single sensing element may be used in multiple different types of sensors. The most notable example is the Hall-effect sensor, which can be found in magnetometers, object presence sensors, speed sensors, current sensors, and dozens more. Modern automobiles can contain Hall-effect sensors everywhere from the ignition system to the trunk-locking mechanism. If you are using a hard drive with rotating platters, it probably contains a Hall-effect sensor to monitor the speed of rotation. If you have a generic computer keyboard, each keypress is probably detected with a Hall-effect sensor. Bearing this in mind, how should a Hall-effect sensor be classified? And where should you expect to find an explanation of how it works? The answer is that where different types of components contain the same type of sensing element, the entry for each component will include a cross-reference to one location where the sensing element is explained in detail. This location will be chosen for its relevance. Thus, Hall-effect sensors are explained in the entry for object presence sensors, because this is their primary function. While it is true that a Hall-effect sensor works by detecting a magnetic field, that is not its most common application. 4. Too Many Sensors! Wikipedia lists more than 100 general types of sensors, and even that list is probably not complete. Consequently, we had to pick and choose. Some of the decisions may seem arbitrary, but all of them were made on the grounds of practicality. There were three principles for deciding what to include and what to leave out. xx Encyclopedia of Electronic Components Volume 3

Encyclopedia Of Electronic Components Charles Platt Fredrik Jansson 2016

Author : Maker Media Corporation
ISBN :
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 31. 22 MB
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Preface This third and final volume of the Encyclopedia of Electronic Components is devoted entirely to sensors. Two factors have caused very significant changes in the field of sensors since the 1980s. First, features such as antilock braking, airbags, and emissions controls stimulated the development of low-priced sensors for automotive applications. Many of these sensors were fabricated in silicon as MEMS (microelectromechanical) devices. The second wave began in 2007 when MEMS sensors were installed in the iPhone. A modern phone may contain almost a dozen different types of sensors, and their size and price have been driven down to a point that would have been unimaginable 20 years previously. Many MEMS sensors are now as cheap as basic semiconductor components such as a voltage regulator or a logic chip, and they are easy to use in conjunction with microcontrollers. In this Encyclopedia, we have allocated significant space to this segment of the market, hoping that the specific products that we have chosen will remain popular and available for at least the next decade. In addition, we have devoted space to older components where durability has been proven. Purpose While much of the information in this volume can be found dispersed among datasheets, introductory texts, Internet sites, and technical briefings published by manufacturers, we believe there is a real need for a durable resource that assembles all the relevant data in one place, properly organized and verified, including details that may be hard to find elsewhere. This volume may also serve a useful purpose by attempting to categorize and classify components in a field that is remarkably chaotic. For example, is an object presence sensor different from a proximity sensor? Some manufacturers seem to think so; others disagree. Understanding the distinctions and the underlying principles can be important if you are trying to decide which sensor to use. Sensor terminology can also be confusing. To take another example, what is the difference between a reflective interrupter, a reflective object sensor, a reflective optical sensor, a reflective photointerrupter, and an opt-pass sensor? These terms are used in various datasheets to describe components that are all retroreflective sensors. Understanding the proliferating variety of terminology can be essential if you simply want to find something in a product index. Organization As in volumes 1 and 2, this volume is organized by subject. For example, if you want to measure temperature, you’ll find the entries for a thermistor and a thermocouple next to each other, in an entire section devoted to the sensing of heat. This will help you to compare capabilities and choose the component that best suits your application. The subject path leading to each sensor is shown at the top of the first page of each entry. For gas flow rate, for instance, you would follow this path: fluid > gas > flow rate Note that the word “fluid” is properly used to include gases as well as liquids. Exceptions and Conflicts Unfortunately, some sensors are not easily categorized. There are four problems in this area. 1. What Does a Sensor Really Sense? A GPS chip is a radio receiver, picking up transmissions from satellites. Does this mean it should be categorized as a sensor of radio waves? No, its purpose is to tell you your location. Therefore, it is categorized as a location sensor. This leads to the first general rule: sensors are categorized by their primary purpose. Secondary purposes may be found in the index. 2. How Many Sensors Are in a Sensor? Many surface-mount chips perform more than one sensing function. For example, an inertial measurement unit (often identified by its acronym, IMU) can contain three gyroscope sensors and three accelerometers—and may contain three magnetometers, too. How should it be categorized? The answer is that an IMU will be mentioned in more than one entry in the Encyclopedia, because it performs more than one function; but it will not have its own separate entry, because each entry in the Encyclopedia is for a single primary sensing function. The names of multisensor chips are, of course, included in the index. 3. How Many Stimuli Can One Sensor Sense? A single sensing element may be used in multiple different types of sensors. The most notable example is the Hall-effect sensor, which can be found in magnetometers, object presence sensors, speed sensors, current sensors, and dozens more. Modern automobiles can contain Hall-effect sensors everywhere from the ignition system to the trunk-locking mechanism. If you are using a hard drive with rotating platters, it probably contains a Hall-effect sensor to monitor the speed of rotation. If you have a generic computer keyboard, each keypress is probably detected with a Hall-effect sensor. Bearing this in mind, how should a Hall-effect sensor be classified? And where should you expect to find an explanation of how it works? The answer is that where different types of components contain the same type of sensing element, the entry for each component will include a cross-reference to one location where the sensing element is explained in detail. This location will be chosen for its relevance. Thus, Hall-effect sensors are explained in the entry for object presence sensors, because this is their primary function. While it is true that a Hall-effect sensor works by detecting a magnetic field, that is not its most common application. 4. Too Many Sensors! Wikipedia lists more than 100 general types of sensors, and even that list is probably not complete. Consequently, we had to pick and choose. Some of the decisions may seem arbitrary, but all of them were made on the grounds of practicality. There were three principles for deciding what to include and what to leave out.

Sensors

Author : Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh
ISBN : 9781461450528
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 25. 14 MB
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Sensors: An Introductory Course provides an essential reference on the fundamentals of sensors. The book is designed to help readers in developing skills and the understanding required in order to implement a wide range of sensors that are commonly used in our daily lives. This book covers the basic concepts in the sensors field, including definitions and terminologies. The physical sensing effects are described, and devices which utilize these effects are presented. The most frequently used organic and inorganic sensors are introduced and the techniques for implementing them are discussed.

Encyclopedia Of Electronic Components Volume 2

Author : Charles Platt
ISBN : 9781449334147
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 51. 2 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 770
Read : 967

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Want to know how to use an electronic component? This second book of a three-volume set includes key information on electronics parts for your projects--complete with photographs, schematics, and diagrams. You'll learn what each one does, how it works, why it's useful, and what variants exist. No matter how much you know about electronics, you'll find fascinating details you've never come across before. Perfect for teachers, hobbyists, engineers, and students of all ages, this reference puts reliable, fact-checked information right at your fingertips--whether you're refreshing your memory or exploring a component for the first time. Beginners will quickly grasp important concepts, and more experienced users will find the specific details their projects require. Volume 2 covers signal processing, including LEDs, LCDs, audio, thyristors, digital logic, and amplification. Unique: the first and only encyclopedia set on electronic components, distilled into three separate volumes Incredibly detailed: includes information distilled from hundreds of sources Easy to browse: parts are clearly organized by component type Authoritative: fact-checked by expert advisors to ensure that the information is both current and accurate Reliable: a more consistent source of information than online sources, product datasheets, and manufacturer's tutorials Instructive: each component description provides details about substitutions, common problems, and workarounds Comprehensive: Volume 1 covers power, electromagnetism, and discrete semiconductors; Volume 2 includes LEDs, LCDs, audio, thyristors, digital logic, and amplification; Volume 3 covers a range of sensing devices.

Networked Life

Author : Mung Chiang
ISBN : 9781107024946
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 70. 1 MB
Format : PDF
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How does the Internet really work? This book explains the technology behind it all, in simple question and answer format.

Electronics All In One For Dummies

Author : Doug Lowe
ISBN : 1118159284
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 67. 81 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
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Take your electronics skills to the next level! If you're looking for a solitary resource that covers everything you need to know about electronics, then look no further. This friendly-and-straightforward guide introduces the basics of electronics and enhances your learning experience by debunking and explaining concepts such as circuits, analog and digital, schematics, voltage, safety concerns, and more. Packed with nearly 900 pages of detailed information, this book shows you how to develop your own breadboard, design your own circuit, and get savvy with schematics. Covers the basics of electronics and demystifies a variety of electronics concepts Encourages you to dive in and design a variety of fun and interesting entertainment, electronics, mobile, and automotive projects Offers troubleshooting advice for common electronics challenges Reviews circuits, schematics, voltage, safety concerns, and much more So, get plugged in and start your next electronics project today with this book by your side!

Handbook Of Modern Sensors

Author : Jacob Fraden
ISBN : 9783319193038
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 54. 89 MB
Format : PDF
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This book presents a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the theory (physical principles), design, and practical implementations of various sensors for scientific, industrial and consumer applications. This latest edition focuses on the sensing technologies driven by the expanding use of sensors in mobile devices. These new miniature sensors will be described, with an emphasis on smart sensors which have embedded processing systems. The chapter on chemical sensors has also been expanded to present the latest developments. Digital systems, however complex and intelligent they may be, must receive information from the outside world that is generally analog and not electrical. Sensors are interface devices between various physical values and the electronic circuits that "understand" only a language of moving electrical charges. In other words, sensors are the eyes, ears, and noses of silicon chips. Unlike other books on sensors, the Handbook of Modern Sensors is organized according to the measured variables (temperature, pressure, position, etc.). This book is a reference text for students, researchers interested in modern instrumentation (applied physicists and engineers), sensor designers, application engineers and technicians whose job it is to understand, select and/or design sensors for practical systems.

How To Diagnose And Fix Everything Electronic

Author : Michael Geier
ISBN : 9780071744232
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 49. 57 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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Master the Art of Electronics Repair In this hands-on guide, a lifelong electronics repair guru shares his tested techniques and invaluable insights. How to Diagnose and Fix Everything Electronic shows you how to repair and extend the life of all kinds of solid-state devices, from modern digital gadgetry to cherished analog products of yesteryear. You'll start by selecting the tools and test equipment you'll need and setting up your workbench. Then, you'll get familiar with components and how they form circuits, stages, and sections of a device. Next, you'll learn how to take a product apart, figure out what's wrong with it, replace components, and reassemble it. Real-world case studies help clarify the topics covered. Tips and tricks for specific devices, such as optical disc players, computers, and video recorders, are also included in this practical resource. Set up a workbench and equip it with tools and test instruments Ensure personal safety and avoid electrical and physical damage to devices Understand electrical units, circuits, and signals Use test equipment, including a digital multimeter, signal generator, frequency counter, and an oscilloscope Repair circuit boards and replace parts Work with components, from capacitors and ICs to transistors and zeners Learn to read block, schematic, and pictorial diagrams Disassemble devices and identify sections and stages Troubleshoot and diagnose to the component level Perform reverse-order reassembly

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