homeward bound american families in the cold war era

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Homeward Bound

Author : Elaine Tyler May
ISBN : 9780786723461
Genre : History
File Size : 78. 49 MB
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A revised edition of the classic, myth-shattering exploration of American family life during the Cold War. When Homeward Bound first appeared in 1988, it forever changed how we understand Cold War America. Elaine Tyler May demonstrated that the Atomic Age and the Cold War shaped American life not just in national politics, but at every level of society, from the boardroom to the bedroom. Her notion of "domestic containment" is now the standard interpretation of the era, and Homeward Bound has become a classic. This new edition includes an updated introduction and a new epilogue examining the legacy of Cold War obsessions with personal and family security in the present day.

Homeward Bound

Author : Elaine Tyler May
ISBN : 9780786723461
Genre : History
File Size : 47. 35 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 111
Read : 765

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A revised edition of the classic, myth-shattering exploration of American family life during the Cold War. When Homeward Bound first appeared in 1988, it forever changed how we understand Cold War America. Elaine Tyler May demonstrated that the Atomic Age and the Cold War shaped American life not just in national politics, but at every level of society, from the boardroom to the bedroom. Her notion of "domestic containment" is now the standard interpretation of the era, and Homeward Bound has become a classic. This new edition includes an updated introduction and a new epilogue examining the legacy of Cold War obsessions with personal and family security in the present day.

Homeward Bound

Author : Elaine Tyler May
ISBN : 9780786723461
Genre : History
File Size : 37. 88 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 683
Read : 608

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A revised edition of the classic, myth-shattering exploration of American family life during the Cold War. When Homeward Bound first appeared in 1988, it forever changed how we understand Cold War America. Elaine Tyler May demonstrated that the Atomic Age and the Cold War shaped American life not just in national politics, but at every level of society, from the boardroom to the bedroom. Her notion of "domestic containment" is now the standard interpretation of the era, and Homeward Bound has become a classic. This new edition includes an updated introduction and a new epilogue examining the legacy of Cold War obsessions with personal and family security in the present day.

Homeward Bound

Author : Jarrod Homer
ISBN : 9781351350549
Genre :
File Size : 47. 76 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Elaine Tyler May's 1988 Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era is a ground-breaking piece of historical and cultural analysis that uses its findings to build a strong argument for its author's view of the course of modern US history. The aim of May's study is to trace the links between Cold War politics and the domestic lives of everyday American families at the time. Historians have long noted the unique domestic trends of 1950s America, with its increased focus on the nuclear family, neatly divided traditional gender roles and aspirational, suburban consumer lifestyles. May's contribution was to analyse the interplay between the domestic scene and the political ideologies of American government, and then to build a carefully-constructed argument that draws attention to the ways in which these seemingly disparate forces are in fact related. May's key achievement was to use her analytical skills to understand the relationships between these different factors. She the traced ways in which domestic life and US foreign policy mirrored one another, showing that the structures and processes they aimed for, while different in scale, were essentially the same. She then carefully brought together different types of historical data, organizing her study to produce a carefully reasoned argument that the American suburban home was in certain direct ways the product of the 'containment' policies that ruled American foreign policy at the time.

America And The Pill

Author : Elaine Tyler May
ISBN : 9780465021543
Genre : History
File Size : 34. 49 MB
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In 1960, the FDA approved the contraceptive commonly known as “the pill.” Advocates, developers, and manufacturers believed that the convenient new drug would put an end to unwanted pregnancy, ensure happy marriages, and even eradicate poverty. But as renowned historian Elaine Tyler May reveals in America and the Pill, it was women who embraced it and created change. They used the pill to challenge the authority of doctors, pharmaceutical companies, and lawmakers. They demonstrated that the pill was about much more than family planning—it offered women control over their bodies and their lives. From little-known accounts of the early years to personal testimonies from young women today, May illuminates what the pill did and did not achieve during its half century on the market.

Fortress America

Author : Elaine Tyler May
ISBN : 9780465093007
Genre : History
File Size : 52. 99 MB
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An award-winning historian untangles the roots of America's culture of fear, and argues that it imperils our democracy For the last sixty years, fear has seeped into every area of American life: Americans own more guns than citizens of any other country, sequester themselves in gated communities, and retreat from public spaces. And yet, crime rates have plummeted, making life in America safer than ever. Why, then, are Americans so afraid-and where does this fear lead to? In this remarkable work of social history, Elaine Tyler May demonstrates how our obsession with security has made citizens fear each other and distrust the government, making America less safe and less democratic. Fortress America charts the rise of a muscular national culture, undercutting the common good. Instead of a thriving democracy of engaged citizens, we have become a paranoid, bunkered, militarized, and divided vigilante nation.

Globetrotting

Author : Damion L. Thomas
ISBN : 9780252094293
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 47. 41 MB
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Throughout the Cold War, the Soviet Union deplored the treatment of African Americans by the U.S. government as proof of hypocrisy in the American promises of freedom and equality. This probing history examines government attempts to manipulate international perceptions of U.S. race relations during the Cold War by sending African American athletes abroad on goodwill tours and in international competitions as cultural ambassadors and visible symbols of American values. Damion L. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American athletes including Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, and the Harlem Globetrotters as the preeminent citizens of the African Diaspora rather than as victims of racial oppression. With athletes in baseball, track and field, and basketball, the government relied on figures whose fame carried the desired message to countries where English was little understood. However, eventually African American athletes began to provide counter-narratives to State Department claims of American exceptionalism, most notably with Tommie Smith and John Carlos's famous black power salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

Great Expectations

Author : Elaine Tyler May
ISBN : 0226511707
Genre : Family & Relationships
File Size : 76. 41 MB
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During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the divorce rate in the United States rose by a staggering 2,000 percent. To understand this dramatic rise, Elaine Tyler May studied over one thousand detailed divorce cases. She found that contrary to common assumptions, divorce was not simply a by-product of women's increasing economic and sexual independence, or a rebellion against marriage. Rather, thwarted hopes for fulfillment in the public sphere drove both men and women to wed at a greater rate and to bring higher expectations to their marriages.

America S Cold War

Author : Campbell Craig
ISBN : 9780674035539
Genre : History
File Size : 71. 36 MB
Format : PDF
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In a brilliant new interpretation, Campbell Craig and Fredrik Logevall reexamine the successes and failures of America’s Cold War. The United States dealt effectively with the threats of Soviet predominance in Europe and of nuclear war in the early years of the conflict. But by engineering this policy, American leaders successfully paved the way for domestic actors and institutions with a vested interest in the struggle’s continuation. Long after the USSR had been effectively contained, Washington continued to wage a virulent Cold War that entailed a massive arms buildup, wars in Korea and Vietnam, the support of repressive regimes and counterinsurgencies, and a pronounced militarization of American political culture.

Unofficial Ambassadors

Author : Donna Alvah
ISBN : 9780814705018
Genre : History
File Size : 44. 19 MB
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"Those who viewed military families as representatives of their nation believed that they could project a friendlier, more humane side of the United States' campaign for dominance in the Cold War and were essential to the ideological battle against communism. In this untold story of Cold War diplomacy, Donna Alvah describes how these "unofficial ambassadors" cultivated relationships with both local people and military families in private homes, churches, schools, women's clubs, shops, and other places."--BOOK JACKET.

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