literacy in african american communities

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Literacy In African American Communities

Author : Joyce L. Harris
ISBN : 9781135664749
Genre : Education
File Size : 63. 65 MB
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This volume explores the unique sociocultural contexts of literacy development, values, and practices in African American communities. African Americans--young and old--are frequently the focus of public discourse about literacy. In a society that values a rather sophisticated level of literacy, they are among those who are most disadvantaged by low literacy achievement. Literacy in African American Communities contributes a fresh perspective by revealing how social history and cultural values converge to influence African Americans' literacy values and practices, acknowledging that literacy issues pertaining to this group are as unique and complex as this group's collective history. Existing literature on literacy in African American communities is typically segmented by age or academic discipline. This fragmentation obscures the cyclical, life-span effects of this population's legacy of low literacy. In contrast, this book brings together in a single-source volume personal, historical, developmental, and cross-disciplinary vantage points to look at both developmental and adult literacy from the perspectives of education, linguistics, psychology, anthropology, and communication sciences and disorders. As a whole, it provides important evidence that the negative cycle of low literacy can be broken by drawing on the literacy experiences found within African American communities.

The Emergence Of African American Literacy Traditions

Author : Phyllis M. Belt-Beyan
ISBN : 0897897994
Genre : Education
File Size : 37. 74 MB
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Traces African American literacy acquisition in the 19th century through family and community efforts.

Libraries Literacy And African American Youth Research And Practice

Author : Sandra Hughes-Hassell
ISBN : 9781440838736
Genre : Language Arts & Disciplines
File Size : 50. 98 MB
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This important book is a call to action for the library community to address the literacy and life outcome gaps impacting African American youth. It provides strategies that enable school and public librarians to transform their services, programs, and collections to be more responsive to the literacy strengths, experiences, and needs of African American youth. • Clarifies the role of public and school librarians in meeting the literacy needs of African American youth • Brings together research findings on the literacy strengths and needs of African American youth and best practices for librarians seeking to improve their services to this population • Provides specific examples of successful programs for working with African American youth that can be adapted by other school or public libraries • Creates an ongoing vehicle for collaborative learner-centered relationships between public and school librarians serving the same community

Self Taught

Author : Heather Andrea Williams
ISBN : 0807888974
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 53. 86 MB
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In this previously untold story of African American self-education, Heather Andrea Williams moves across time to examine African Americans' relationship to literacy during slavery, during the Civil War, and in the first decades of freedom. Self-Taught traces the historical antecedents to freedpeople's intense desire to become literate and demonstrates how the visions of enslaved African Americans emerged into plans and action once slavery ended. Enslaved people, Williams contends, placed great value in the practical power of literacy, whether it was to enable them to read the Bible for themselves or to keep informed of the abolition movement and later the progress of the Civil War. Some slaves devised creative and subversive means to acquire literacy, and when slavery ended, they became the first teachers of other freedpeople. Soon overwhelmed by the demands for education, they called on northern missionaries to come to their aid. Williams argues that by teaching, building schools, supporting teachers, resisting violence, and claiming education as a civil right, African Americans transformed the face of education in the South to the great benefit of both black and white southerners.

A Community Text Arises

Author : Beverly J. Moss
ISBN : UCSC:32106016640796
Genre : Religion
File Size : 23. 58 MB
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This text emerges from an ethnographic study of literacy in three African American churches. These data illuminate the ways that the primary model of a literate text is shaped and used in African American churches.

Forgotten Readers

Author : Elizabeth McHenry
ISBN : 0822329956
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 47. 26 MB
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DIVRecovers the history of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century African American reading societies./div

African American Literacies

Author : Elaine Richardson
ISBN : 9781134492275
Genre : Language Arts & Disciplines
File Size : 66. 85 MB
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African-American Literacies is a personal, public and political exploration of the problems faced by student writers from the African-American Vernacular English (AAVE) culture. Drawing on personal experience, Elaine Richardson provides a compelling account of the language and literacy practices of African-American students. The book analyses the problems encountered by the teachers of AAVE speakers, and offers African American centred theories and pedagogical methods of addressing these problems. Richardson builds on recent research to argue that teachers need not only to recognise the value and importance of African-American culture, but also to use African-American English when teaching AAVE speakers standard English. African-American Literacies offers a holistic and culturally relevant approach to literacy education, and is essential reading for anyone with an interest in the literacy practices of African-American students.

Black Intellectuals

Author : William M. Banks
ISBN : 0393316742
Genre : History
File Size : 75. 83 MB
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A study of the role of African-American intellectuals from the slavery era to the present discusses the contributions of Frederick Douglass, Anna Cooper, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Toni Morrison

Young Gifted And Black

Author : Theresa Perry
ISBN : 9780807095348
Genre : Education
File Size : 54. 14 MB
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Young, Gifted, and Black is a unique joint effort by three leading African-American scholars to radically reframe the debates swirling around the achievement of African-American students in school. In three separate but allied essays, Theresa Perry, Claude Steele, and Asa Hilliard place students' social identity as African-Americans at the very center of the discussion. They all argue that the unique social and cultural position Black students occupy, in a society which often devalues and stereotypes African American identity, fundamentally shapes students' experience of school and sets up unique obstacles. And they all argue that a proper understanding of the forces at work can lead to practical, powerful methods for promoting high achievement at all levels. Theresa Perry argues that African-American students face dilemmas, founded in the experience of race and ethnicity in America, that make the task of achievement distinctive and difficult. (For instance: "How do I commit myself to achieve, to work hard over time in school, if I cannot predict when or under what circumstances this hard work will be acknowledged and recognized?") She uncovers a rich and powerful African- American philosophy of education, historically forged against such obstacles and capable of addressing them, by reading African-American narratives from Frederick Douglass to Maya Angelou. She carefully critiques the most popular theoretical explanations for group differences in achievement. And she lays out how educators today-in a postcivil rights era-can draw on theory and on the historical power of the African-American philosophy and tradition of education to reorganize the school experience of African-American students. Claude Steele reports stunningly clear empirical psychological evidence that when Black students believe they are being judged as members of a stereotyped group rather than as individuals, they do worse on tests. He finds the mechanism, which he calls "stereotype threat," to be a quite general one, affecting women's performance in mathematics, for instance, where stereotypes about gender operate. He analyzes the subtle psychology of stereotype threat and reflects on the broad implications of his research for education, suggesting techniques-based again on evidence from controlled psychological experiments-that teachers and mentors and schools can use to counter stereotype threat's powerful effect. Asa Hilliard's ends essay, against a variety of false theories and misguided views of African American achievement, and focuses on actual schools and programs and teachers around the country that allow African-American students achieve at high levels, describing what they are like and what makes them work. Young, Gifted, and Black will change the way we think and talk about African American student achievement and will be necessary reading on this topic for years to come.

Race Community And Urban Schools

Author : Stuart Greene
ISBN : 0807754641
Genre : Education
File Size : 61. 27 MB
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In this important book, award-winning author Stuart Greene enters the ongoing conversation about low-income African American families and their role in helping their children flourish. Greene focuses on parents' self-defined roles within the context of race, urban development, and an economy that has created opportunity for some and displaced others. Moving beyond analysis to action, the author descibes a partnering strategy to help educators understand the lived experiences of children and families and to use their funds of knowledge as resources for teaching. This book combines critical race theory, critical geography, first-hand accounts, and research on literacy practices at home to provide a powerful tool that will help teachers and administrators see families in new ways. This book: describes a partnering model that encourages educators to consider the social, cultural, racial, and economic factors that shape parent engagement with schools; identifies important areas of misunderstanding between African American parents and their children's teachers; and incorporates personal narratives of children whose voices are rarely part of research on parent involvement.

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