moral commerce quakers and the transatlantic boycott of the slave labor economy

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Moral Commerce

Author : Julie L. Holcomb
ISBN : 9781501706073
Genre : History
File Size : 70. 55 MB
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How can the simple choice of a men's suit be a moral statement and a political act? When the suit is made of free-labor wool rather than slave-grown cotton. In Moral Commerce, Julie L. Holcomb traces the genealogy of the boycott of slave labor from its seventeenth-century Quaker origins through its late nineteenth-century decline. In their failures and in their successes, in their resilience and their persistence, antislavery consumers help us understand the possibilities and the limitations of moral commerce. Quaker antislavery rhetoric began with protests against the slave trade before expanding to include boycotts of the use and products of slave labor. For more than one hundred years, British and American abolitionists highlighted consumers’ complicity in sustaining slavery. The boycott of slave labor was the first consumer movement to transcend the boundaries of nation, gender, and race in an effort by reformers to change the conditions of production. The movement attracted a broad cross-section of abolitionists: conservative and radical, Quaker and non-Quaker, male and female, white and black. The men and women who boycotted slave labor created diverse, biracial networks that worked to reorganize the transatlantic economy on an ethical basis. Even when they acted locally, supporters embraced a global vision, mobilizing the boycott as a powerful force that could transform the marketplace. For supporters of the boycott, the abolition of slavery was a step toward a broader goal of a just and humane economy. The boycott failed to overcome the power structures that kept slave labor in place; nonetheless, the movement’s historic successes and failures have important implications for modern consumers.

Warner Mifflin

Author : Gary B. Nash
ISBN : 9780812294361
Genre : History
File Size : 43. 89 MB
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Warner Mifflin—energetic, uncompromising, and reviled—was the key figure connecting the abolitionist movements before and after the American Revolution. A descendant of one of the pioneering families of William Penn's "Holy Experiment," Mifflin upheld the Quaker pacifist doctrine, carrying the peace testimony to Generals Howe and Washington across the blood-soaked Germantown battlefield and traveling several thousand miles by horse up and down the Atlantic seaboard to stiffen the spines of the beleaguered Quakers, harried and exiled for their neutrality during the war for independence. Mifflin was also a pioneer of slave reparations, championing the radical idea that after their liberation, Africans in America were entitled to cash payments and land or shared crop arrangements. Preaching "restitution," Mifflin led the way in making Kent County, Delaware, a center of reparationist doctrine. After the war, Mifflin became the premier legislative lobbyist of his generation, introducing methods of reaching state and national legislators to promote antislavery action. Detesting his repeated exercise of the right of petition and hating his argument that an all-seeing and affronted God would punish Americans for "national sins," many Southerners believed Mifflin was the most dangerous man in America—"a meddling fanatic" who stirred the embers of sectionalism after the ratification of the Constitution of 1787. Yet he inspired those who believed that the United States had betrayed its founding principles of natural and inalienable rights by allowing the cancer of slavery and the dispossession of Indian lands to continue in the 1790s. Writing in beautiful prose and marshaling fascinating evidence, Gary B. Nash constructs a convincing case that Mifflin belongs in the Quaker antislavery pantheon with William Southeby, Benjamin Lay, John Woolman, and Anthony Benezet.

The Oxford Handbook Of Quaker Studies

Author : Stephen W. Angell
ISBN : 9780199608676
Genre : Religion
File Size : 27. 58 MB
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This handbook provides an in-depth survey of historical readings of Quakerism; a treatment of its key theological premises and its links with wider Christian thinking; an analysis of its distinctive ecclesiastical forms and practices; chapters on its social, economic, political, and ethical outcomes; as well as an extensive bibliography.

The Fearless Benjamin Lay

Author : Marcus Rediker
ISBN : 9780807035924
Genre : History
File Size : 24. 7 MB
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Early Life -- "A Man of Strife & Contention"--Philadelphia's "Men of Renown"--How Slave-Keepers became Apostates -- Books and a New Life -- Death, Memory, Impact

Quaker Studies An Overview The Current State Of The Field

Author : C. Wess Daniels
ISBN : 9789004365070
Genre : Religion
File Size : 80. 79 MB
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Jon R. Kershner, Robynne Rogers Healey and C. Wess Daniels explore the historiography and contemporary fields of Quaker theology and philosophy, history, and the rise of sociology. Developments within Quaker Studies are compared to external sources and tracked over time.

The World Of Antebellum America A Daily Life Encyclopedia 2 Volumes

Author : Alexandra Kindell
ISBN : 9781440837111
Genre : History
File Size : 86. 25 MB
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This set provides insight into the lives of ordinary Americans free and enslaved, in farms and cities, in the North and the South, who lived during the years of 1815 to 1860. • Provides intimate details about the personal lives of Americans during the Antebellum Era • Demonstrates the diversity of the American experience in the years before the Civil War • Makes clear how hard Americans worked to build their lives while still participating in the democratic process • Explores how Americans dealt with the daily demands of life as national and regional issues created insecurity and instability • Includes 40 primary source documents with detailed introductions to realize Antebellum America

Warner Mifflin

Author : Gary B. Nash
ISBN : 9780812249491
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 79. 60 MB
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Warner Mifflin—energetic, uncompromising, and reviled—was the key figure connecting the abolitionist movements before and after the American Revolution. A descendant of one of the pioneering families of William Penn's "Holy Experiment," Mifflin upheld the Quaker pacifist doctrine, carrying the peace testimony to Generals Howe and Washington across the blood-soaked Germantown battlefield and traveling several thousand miles by horse up and down the Atlantic seaboard to stiffen the spines of the beleaguered Quakers, harried and exiled for their neutrality during the war for independence. Mifflin was also a pioneer of slave reparations, championing the radical idea that after their liberation, Africans in America were entitled to cash payments and land or shared crop arrangements. Preaching "restitution," Mifflin led the way in making Kent County, Delaware, a center of reparationist doctrine. After the war, Mifflin became the premier legislative lobbyist of his generation, introducing methods of reaching state and national legislators to promote antislavery action. Detesting his repeated exercise of the right of petition and hating his argument that an all-seeing and affronted God would punish Americans for "national sins," many Southerners believed Mifflin was the most dangerous man in America—"a meddling fanatic" who stirred the embers of sectionalism after the ratification of the Constitution of 1787. Yet he inspired those who believed that the United States had betrayed its founding principles of natural and inalienable rights by allowing the cancer of slavery and the dispossession of Indian lands to continue in the 1790s. Writing in beautiful prose and marshaling fascinating evidence, Gary B. Nash constructs a convincing case that Mifflin belongs in the Quaker antislavery pantheon with William Southeby, Benjamin Lay, John Woolman, and Anthony Benezet.

New England Rocks

Author : Michael J. Vieira
ISBN : 9781439660348
Genre : History
File Size : 50. 22 MB
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New England is a rocky, rugged region. Its towns are marked by stone walls and its cities anchored by native granite and marble buildings. Historically significant boulders, many with Native American as well as colonial and neo-pagan origins, attract tourists from around the world. Some are formations that are complex in shape, form and significance, while others contain enigmatic messages, meanings and intriguing characteristics. Learn more about the famous sites like Plymouth Rock, the Old Man of the Mountain and the Sleeping Giant, as well as the lesser-known such as Profile Rock, Dighton Rock and Slate Rock. Authors Michael J. Vieira and J. North Conway examine the history, the legends and the people associated with forty-five notable geological wonders.

Shopping For Change

Author : Louis Hyman
ISBN : 9781501712630
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 75. 57 MB
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Freedom Burning

Author : Richard Huzzey
ISBN : 9780801465376
Genre : History
File Size : 72. 83 MB
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After Britain abolished slavery throughout most of its empire in 1834, Victorians adopted a creed of "anti-slavery" as a vital part of their national identity and sense of moral superiority to other civilizations. The British government used diplomacy, pressure, and violence to suppress the slave trade, while the Royal Navy enforced abolition worldwide and an anxious public debated the true responsibilities of an anti-slavery nation. This crusade was far from altruistic or compassionate, but Richard Huzzey argues that it forged national debates and political culture long after the famous abolitionist campaigns of William Wilberforce and Thomas Clarkson had faded into memory. These anti-slavery passions shaped racist and imperialist prejudices, new forms of coerced labor, and the expansion of colonial possessions. In a sweeping narrative that spans the globe, Freedom Burning explores the intersection of philanthropic, imperial, and economic interests that underlay Britain's anti-slavery zeal- from London to Liberia, the Sudan to South Africa, Canada to the Caribbean, and the British East India Company to the Confederate States of America. Through careful attention to popular culture, official records, and private papers, Huzzey rewrites the history of the British Empire and a century-long effort to end the global trade in human lives.

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