port washington images of america

Download Book Port Washington Images Of America in PDF format. You can Read Online Port Washington Images Of America here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Port Washington

Author : Richard D. Smith
ISBN : 0738583650
Genre : History
File Size : 26. 98 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 218
Read : 775

Get This Book


Port Washington is a picturesque community on the shores of Lake Michigan, just a short drive north of Milwaukee. It celebrates its 175th birthday in September 2010. This book is a vivid description of the city's history, from the Native Americans who lived on these shores when the voyageurs first arrived, through the birth of a thriving and industrious community of immigrants who settled here after leaving Germany and Luxembourg. The pages touch on the early years of industry, focusing on the maritime heritage of Port Washington, and give the reader a wonderful photographic tour of what Port Washington was like over 100 years ago. Some of these photographs have never before been published and some of the buildings no longer exist, which makes this book a treasure trove of historic images to be enjoyed by many generations.

D W Griffith S The Birth Of A Nation

Author : Melvyn Stokes
ISBN : 9780199887514
Genre : History
File Size : 38. 24 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 464
Read : 566

Get This Book


In this deeply researched and vividly written volume, Melvyn Stokes illuminates the origins, production, reception and continuing history of this ground-breaking, aesthetically brilliant, and yet highly controversial movie. By going back to the original archives, particularly the NAACP and D. W. Griffith Papers, Stokes explodes many of the myths surrounding The Birth of a Nation (1915). Yet the story that remains is fascinating: the longest American film of its time, Griffith's film incorporated many new features, including the first full musical score compiled for an American film. It was distributed and advertised by pioneering methods that would quickly become standard. Through the high prices charged for admission and the fact that it was shown, at first, only in "live" theaters with orchestral accompaniment, Birth played a major role in reconfiguring the American movie audience by attracting more middle-class patrons. But if the film was a milestone in the history of cinema, it was also undeniably racist. Stokes shows that the darker side of this classic movie has its origins in the racist ideas of Thomas Dixon, Jr. and Griffith's own Kentuckian background and earlier film career. The book reveals how, as the years went by, the campaign against the film became increasingly successful. In the 1920s, for example, the NAACP exploited the fact that the new Ku Klux Klan, which used Griffith's film as a recruiting and retention tool, was not just anti-black, but also anti-Catholic and anti-Jewish, as a way to mobilize new allies in opposition to the film. This crisply written book sheds light on both the film's racism and the aesthetic brilliance of Griffith's filmmaking. It is a must-read for anyone interested in the cinema.

Within The Plantation Household

Author : Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
ISBN : 9780807864227
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 52. 21 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 327
Read : 1270

Get This Book


Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing upon massive research in diaries, letters, memoirs, and oral histories, the author argues that the lives of antebellum southern women, enslaved and free, differed fundamentally from those of northern women and that it is not possible to understand antebellum southern women by applying models derived from New England sources.

The City In Cultural Context

Author : John Agnew
ISBN : 9781135667153
Genre : Reference
File Size : 72. 22 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 522
Read : 652

Get This Book


Routledge Library Editions: The City reprints some of the most important works in urban studies published in the last century. For further information on this collection please email [email protected]

Gateway To The Promised Land

Author : Mario Maffi
ISBN : 0814755097
Genre : History
File Size : 58. 1 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 320
Read : 814

Get This Book


This essential reference book is must reading for mental health professionals who assess and treat children and adolescents. Comprehensive, detailed, clearly written, and innovative, it presents the approaches of the leading clinicians in their fields.

Understanding U S Latin American Relations

Author : Mark Eric Williams
ISBN : 9781136645747
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 46. 67 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 176
Read : 991

Get This Book


This book examines U.S.–Latin American relations from an historical, contemporary, and theoretical perspective. By drawing examples from the distant and more recent past—and interweaving history with theory—Williams illustrates the enduring principles of International Relations theory and provides students the conceptual tools to make sense of inter-American relations. It is a masterful guide for how to organize facts, think systematically about issues, weigh competing explanations, and confidently draw your own conclusions regarding the past, present, and future of international politics in the region.

Thomas Jefferson

Author : James Lantos
ISBN : 9781608890200
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 31. 59 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 720
Read : 781

Get This Book


Over 90 images relating to Thomas Jefferson are found in this full-color paperback. Part of Applewood's Pictorial America series, the book features images drawn from historical sources and includes prints, paintings, illustrations, and photographs. This small gem is the ideal gift for anyone interested in a concise and beautiful visual biography of the author of the Declaration of Independence and the third U.S. President.

Kindred By Choice

Author : H. Glenn Penny
ISBN : 9781469607658
Genre : History
File Size : 62. 99 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 540
Read : 442

Get This Book


How do we explain the persistent preoccupation with American Indians in Germany and the staggering numbers of Germans one encounters as visitors to Indian country? As H. Glenn Penny demonstrates, that preoccupation is rooted in an affinity for American Indians that has permeated German cultures for two centuries. This affinity stems directly from German polycentrism, notions of tribalism, a devotion to resistance, a longing for freedom, and a melancholy sense of shared fate. Locating the origins of the fascination for Indian life in the transatlantic world of German cultures in the nineteenth century, Penny explores German settler colonialism in the American Midwest, the rise and fall of German America, and the transnational worlds of American Indian performers. As he traces this phenomenon through the twentieth century, Penny engages debates about race, masculinity, comparative genocides, and American Indians' reactions to Germans' interests in them. He also assesses what persists of the affinity across the political ruptures of modern German history and challenges readers to rethink how cultural history is made.

Imperialism And Expansionism In American History A Social Political And Cultural Encyclopedia And Document Collection 4 Volumes

Author : Chris J. Magoc
ISBN : 9781610694308
Genre : History
File Size : 64. 21 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 349
Read : 1100

Get This Book


This four-volume encyclopedia chronicles the historical roots of the United States' current military dominance, documenting its growth from continental expansionism to hemispheric hegemony to global empire. • Overviews the history of American imperialism through chronologically arranged entries that are multidisciplinary, incisively written, and informed by the latest scholarship • Covers issues ranging from the fur trade of the frontier era to today's complex engagement in the Middle East and Africa • Shares key insights on the intersection of popular culture with the projection of U.S. military power • Includes background material and an extensive selection of primary documents that will help students practice critical reading, thinking, and writing skills • Features numerous photos, illustrations, and sidebars that enliven the text and engage students in participatory learning

Prairie Imperialists

Author : Katharine Bjork
ISBN : 9780812295641
Genre : History
File Size : 23. 14 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 413
Read : 1273

Get This Book


The Spanish-American War marked the emergence of the United States as an imperial power. It was when the United States first landed troops overseas and established governments of occupation in the Philippines, Cuba, and other formerly Spanish colonies. But such actions to extend U.S. sovereignty abroad, argues Katharine Bjork, had a precedent in earlier relations with Native nations at home. In Prairie Imperialists, Bjork traces the arc of American expansion by showing how the Army's conquests of what its soldiers called "Indian Country" generated a repertoire of actions and understandings that structured encounters with the racial others of America's new island territories following the War of 1898. Prairie Imperialists follows the colonial careers of three Army officers from the domestic frontier to overseas posts in Cuba and the Philippines. The men profiled—Hugh Lenox Scott, Robert Lee Bullard, and John J. Pershing—internalized ways of behaving in Indian Country that shaped their approach to later colonial appointments abroad. Scott's ethnographic knowledge and experience with Native Americans were valorized as an asset for colonial service; Bullard and Pershing, who had commanded African American troops, were regarded as particularly suited for roles in the pacification and administration of colonial peoples overseas. After returning to the mainland, these three men played prominent roles in the "Punitive Expedition" President Woodrow Wilson sent across the southern border in 1916, during which Mexico figured as the next iteration of "Indian Country." With rich biographical detail and ambitious historical scope, Prairie Imperialists makes fundamental connections between American colonialism and the racial dimensions of domestic political and social life—during peacetime and while at war. Ultimately, Bjork contends, the concept of "Indian Country" has served as the guiding force of American imperial expansion and nation building for the past two and a half centuries and endures to this day.

Top Download:

Best Books