race and gender in the classroom teachers privilege and enduring social inequalities

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Race And Gender In The Classroom

Author : Laurie Cooper Stoll
ISBN : 9780739176436
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 66. 73 MB
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Race and Gender in the Classroom explores the paradoxes of education, race, and gender, as Laurie Cooper Stoll follows eighteen teachers carrying out their roles as educators in an era of “post-racial” and “post-gendered” politics. Because there are a number of contentious issues converging simultaneously in these teachers’ everyday lives, this is a book comprised of several interrelated stories. On the one hand, this is a story about teachers who care deeply about their students but are generally oblivious to the ways in which their words and behaviors reinforce dominant narratives about race and gender, constructing for their students a worldview in which race and gender do not matter despite their students’ lived experiences demonstrating otherwise. This is a story about dedicated, overworked teachers who are trying to keep their heads above water while meeting the myriad demands placed upon them in a climate of high-stakes testing. This is a story about the disconnect between those who mandate educational policy like superintendents and school boards and the teachers who are expected to implement those policies often with little or no input and few resources. This is ultimately a story, however, about how the institution of education itself operates in a “post-racial” and “post-gendered” society.

Social Inequality In A Global Age

Author : Scott Sernau
ISBN : 9781483321141
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 66. 75 MB
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This fully updated fourth edition of Scott Sernau's highly acclaimed Social Inequality in a Global Age provides a sociological framework for analyzing inequality within the United States in the context of our changing global economy. With vivid examples and insightful analysis, this first-of-its-kind best seller offers students a complete picture of inequality and stratification systems. Using lively writing and examples drawn straight from today's headlines, Sernau explores each issue and dimension of inequality as he analyzes the relationship between global stratification and internal (domestic) systems of inequality. He also introduces both classical and contemporary theories of stratification to help interpret these real-world illustrations. Throughout, a focus on social action and community engagement encourages students to become involved, active learners in the classroom and in their communities.

Social Exclusion Power And Video Game Play

Author : David G. Embrick
ISBN : 9780739138625
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 70. 10 MB
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While many books and articles are emerging on the new area of game studies and the application of computer games to learning, therapeutic, military and entertainment environments, few have attempted to contextualize the importance of virtual play within a broader social, cultural and political environment that raises the question of the significance of work, play, power and inequalities in the modern world. Many studies tend to concentrate on the content of virtual games, but few have questioned how power is produced or reproduced by publishers, gamers or even social media; how social exclusion (e.g., race, class, gender, etc.) in the virtual environments are reproduced from the real world; and how actors are able to use new media to transcend their fears, anxieties, prejudices and assumptions. The articles presented by the contributors in this volume represent cutting-edge research in the area of critical game play with the hope to draw attention to the need for more studies that are both sociological and critical.

Privilege

Author : Shamus Rahman Khan
ISBN : 1400836220
Genre : Education
File Size : 69. 55 MB
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As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality. In Privilege, Shamus Khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. He shows that St. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Yet, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, family connections, and high culture, current St. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, faculty, and staff, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule.

Intersectionality In Educational Research

Author : James L. Olive
ISBN : 9781620360989
Genre : Education
File Size : 21. 58 MB
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The purpose of this work is to advance understanding of intersectional theory and its application to research in education. The scholars whose work appear in this volume utilize intersectional theory and research methods to work in fields and disciplines such as Education, Sociology, Women’s Studies, Africana Studies, Human Development, Higher Education Administration, Leadership Studies, and Justice Studies. The book illustrates how intersectional theory can be used in both quantitative and qualitative education research on college student access and success, faculty satisfaction and professional development, and K-12 educational issues such as high school dropouts and bullying. This book is unique, as no other book ties intersectionality to the research process. Key Features: * Readers will learn the basic tenets of intersectionality and how it can be useful in education research. * Readers will learn how intersectionality can be used to analyze both quantitative (large scale survey) and qualitative (interview, participant observation, and ethnographic) data. * Lastly, readers will learn how intersectionality can be particularly useful in examining the experiences of diverse groups of students attending elementary schools, high schools, colleges and universities, and faculty working at post-secondary institutions. Intersectionality is increasingly being used in research and education. This theory holds great promise in exploring students’ experiences in terms of access, success, and outcomes for marginalized groups. In essence, application of the theory promotes critical complex thinking regarding the intersectionality of race, class, and gender and their outcomes.

The Changing Terrain Of Race And Ethnicity

Author : Maria Krysan
ISBN : 9781610443425
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 32. 41 MB
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The legal institutions of overt racism in the United States have been eliminated, but social surveys and investigations of social institutions confirm the continuing significance of race and the enduring presence of negative racial attitudes. This shift from codified and explicit racism to more subtle forms comes at a time when the very boundaries of race and ethnicity are being reshaped by immigration and a rising recognition that old systems of racial classification inadequately capture a diverse America. In The Changing Terrain of Race and Ethnicity, editors Maria Krysan and Amanda Lewis bring together leading scholars of racial dynamics to study the evolution of America’s racial problem and its consequences for race relations in the future. The Changing Terrain of Race and Ethnicity opens by attempting to answer a puzzling question: how is it that so many whites think racism is no longer a problem but so many nonwhites disagree? Sociologist Lawrence Bobo contends that whites exhibit what he calls “laissez faire racism,” which ignores historical and structural contributions to racial inequality and does nothing to remedy the injustices of the status quo. Tyrone Forman makes a similar case in his chapter, contending that an emphasis on “color blindness” allows whites to be comforted by the idea that all races are on a level playing field, while not recognizing the advantages they themselves have reaped from years of inequality. The book then moves to a discussion of the new ways that Americans view race. Eduardo Bonilla-Silva and Karen Glover argue that the United States is moving from a black-white divide to a tripartite system, where certain light-skinned, non-threatening minority groups are considered “honorary whites.” The book’s final section reexamines the theoretical underpinnings of scholarship on race and ethnicity. Joe Feagin argues that research on racism focuses too heavily on how racial boundaries are formed and needs to concentrate more on how those boundaries are used to maintain privileges for certain groups at the expense of others. Manning Marable contends that racism should be addressed at an institutional level to see the prevalence of “structural racism”—deeply entrenched patterns of inequality that are coded by race and justified by stereotypes. The Changing Terrain of Race and Ethnicity provides an in-depth view of racism in modern America, which may be less conspicuous but not necessarily less destructive than its predecessor, Jim Crow. The book’s rich analysis and theoretical insight shed light on how, despite many efforts to end America’s historic racial problem, it has evolved and persisted into the 21st century.

Race In Society

Author : Margaret L. Andersen, Professor
ISBN : 9781442258044
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 40. 85 MB
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Race in Society is a thorough yet brief text intended primarily for race and ethnicity courses. It is anchored in contemporary social science scholarship and is written in a narrative style that makes it easily accessible to students.

Sociologists In Action On Inequalities

Author : Shelley K. White
ISBN : 9781452242026
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 58. 12 MB
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This anthology provides vivid examples of how sociology can be put to good use in today's world. Every reading focuses on public issues concerning race, class, gender, ethnicity, nationality, and sexuality. Each chapter includes stories from practicing sociologists that help students better understand how their sociology studies can be applied and provides answers to the question, "...but what can I do with a sociology degree?" Discussion questions and suggested additional readings and resources at the end of each chapter give students the opportunity to delve further into the topics covered and carry out full and nuanced discussions, grounded in the "real world" work of public sociologists.

Risky Lessons

Author : Jessica Fields
ISBN : 9780813544991
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 24. 35 MB
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Curricula in U.S. public schools are often the focus of heated debate, and few subjects spark more controversy than sex education. While conservatives argue that sexual abstinence should be the only message, liberals counter that an approach that provides comprehensive instruction and helps young people avoid sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy is necessary. Caught in the middle are the students and teachers whose everyday experiences of sex education are seldom as clear-cut as either side of the debate suggests.Risky Lessons brings readers inside three North Carolina middle schools to show how students and teachers support and subvert the official curriculum through their questions, choices, viewpoints, and reactions. Most important, the book highlights how sex education's formal and informal lessons reflect and reinforce gender, race, and class inequalities.Ultimately critical of both conservative and liberal approaches, Fields argues for curricula that promote social and sexual justice. Sex education's aim need not be limited to reducing the risk of adolescent pregnancies, disease, and sexual activity. Rather, its lessons should help young people to recognize and contend with sexual desires, power, and inequalities.

Spectacular Things Happen Along The Way

Author : Brian D. Schultz
ISBN : 9780807773581
Genre : Education
File Size : 45. 88 MB
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A fresh take on what happens when a teacher says enough is enough and does the unthinkable: design a curriculum based on their students’ actual needs and aspirations. Flying in the face of reason, Brian Schultz did just that when he challenged his 5th grade class in urban Chicago to name a problem in their community that they wanted to solve. As the students of Room 405 focus on replacing their dilapidated school building, a historic voyage of repair and healing begins. Ultimately, it is their own questions and incredible accomplishments that make them realize their commitment and ability to change the world around them. This gem captures the remarkable transformations of everyone involved. Spectacular Things Happen Along the Way is a significant reminder of the influence of our nation's determined teachers and what they can achieve whe they go against the grain of rigid curriculums and authoritarian standardized testing. Schultz’s debut work is a must-read for anyone who believes in the power of challenging convention, the authority of human compassion, and finding solutions that work for America's youth. “Once I began reading, I couldn't put it down. The power here is in the details. It’s a marvelous, important book and is badly needed at a moment when the values it upholds are under an unrelenting assault from forces of reactionary ignorance.” —Jonathan Kozol, author of Amazing Grace “Carr Community Academy is a crumbling elementary school in Chicago next to one of the largest and most perilous public housing projects—Cabrini Green. It also is the location of one of the more spectacular fifth-grade classes in the country.” —Ralph Nader, consumer advocate, author, and founder, Public Citizen research group “In a time of ever more testing and standardization, Brian Schultz demonstrates in powerful ways what the critically democratic alternative looks like. Anyone who wants to make a difference in urban education needs to read this book.” —Michael W. Apple, author of Educating the “Right” Way “This fifth-grade class illustrates some important lessons about America: The neglect of the inner-city poor, the virtues of creative public service, of teaching to educate-not just to pass a test-and of perseverance.” —Robert Siegel, All Things Considered, National Public Radio

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