resilience in deaf children adaptation through emerging adulthood

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Resilience In Deaf Children

Author : Debra H. Zand
ISBN : 1441977961
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 51. 26 MB
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Historically, the diagnosis of deafness in a child has been closely associated with profound disability, including such typical outcomes as unmet potential and a life of isolation. A major shift away from this negative view has led to improved prospects for deaf children. Resilience in Deaf Children emphasizes not only the capability of deaf individuals to withstand adversity, but also their positive adaptation through interactions with parents, peers, school, and community. In this engaging volume, leading researchers and professionals pay particular attention to such issues as attachment, self-concept, and social competence, which are crucial to the development of all young people. In addition, the volume offers strategies for family members, professionals, and others for promoting the well-being of deaf children and youth. Coverage includes: Attachment formation among deaf infants and their primary caregivers. Deaf parents as sources of positive development and resilience for deaf infants. Enhancing resilience to mental health disorders in deaf school children. Strength-based guidelines for improving the developmental environments of deaf children and youth. Community cultural wealth and deaf adolescents’ resilience. Self-efficacy in the management of anticipated work-family conflict as a resilience factor among young deaf adults. Resilience in Deaf Children is essential reading for researchers, clinicians, and graduate students in clinical child, school, and developmental psychology as well as for allied researchers and professionals in such disciplines as school counseling, occupational therapy, and social work.

Educating Deaf Learners

Author : Marc Marschark
ISBN : 9780190215194
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 74. 96 MB
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Education in general, and education for deaf learners in particular, has gone through significant changes over the past three decades. And change certainly will be the buzzword in the foreseeable future. The rapid growth of information and communication technology as well as progress in educational, psychological, and allied research fields have many scholars questioning aspects of traditional school concepts. For example, should the classroom be "flipped" so that students receive instruction online at home and do "homework" in school? At the same time, inclusive education has changed the traditional landscape of special education and thus of deaf education in many if not all countries, and yet deaf children continued to lag significantly behind hearing peers in academic achievement. As a consequence of technological innovations (e.g., digital hearing aids and early bilateral cochlear implants), the needs of many deaf learners have changed considerably. Parents and professionals, however, are just now coming to recognize that there are cognitive, experiential, and social-emotional differences between deaf and hearing students likely to affect academic outcomes. Understanding such differences and determining ways in which to accommodate them through global cooperation must become a top priority in educating deaf learners. Through the participation of an international, interdisciplinary set of scholars, Educating Deaf Learners takes a broader view of learning and academic achievement than any previous work, considering the whole child. In adopting this broad perspective, the authors capture the complexities and commonalities in the social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic mosaic of which the deaf child is a part. It is only through such a holistic consideration that we can understand their academic potential.

Social Competence Of Deaf And Hard Of Hearing Children

Author : Shirin D. Antia
ISBN : 9780190243210
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 63. 42 MB
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Social Competence of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children addresses the development, assessment, and promotion of social competence in children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH). Most children readily develop social competence through the mutually dependent development of social skills and social relationships. Why then write a book on the social competence of DHH children? Hearing loss, with its resulting communication challenges, has the potential to impede the development of social skills and restrict social relationships. In this volume, Shirin D. Antia and Kathryn H. Kreimeyer highlight multiple strategies that teachers, families, and community members can utilize to promote the social competence of DHH children. The authors approach this topic by first describing the development and expression of social competence in infants, as well as in preschool- and school-age hearing and DHH children. Socially competent children display a flexible repertoire of social behaviors that are appropriately utilized in varying social situations and which further children's social goals. Since social competence develops initially through interactions between infants and their caretakers, a primary consideration for children with hearing loss is that the infant and caretaker share a common communication approach to facilitate early interaction. As infants become preschool age, opportunities for interactions with other children increase and social interactions revolve around play. The development of interactive and of pretend play requires children to communicate with one another to assume roles, share fantasies, and solve social conflicts. DHH children must develop communication skills to participate in interactive play, and hearing children may need guidance to successfully engage with DHH peers. For school-age children, the importance of peer acceptance increases; DHH children need supportive situations both within and outside of school to interact with peers, develop friendships, and refine the social behaviors that promote peer acceptance. The authors present a variety of practical ways to assess the social competence of DHH children. They emphasize the role of assessment in identifying social strengths and needs to establish a basis for any necessary intervention. They then present ways to promote social competence, with a separate focus on strategies appropriate for young DHH children and for school-age DHH children. For both age groups, the authors address the role of families, professionals, schools, and communities in helping children develop the skills needed to become socially competent individuals. This book will be a valuable resource for the parents and families of DHH children, for the general and special educators who teach these children, and for the researchers who describe development and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies to promote the social competence of DHH children.

Auditory Verbal Practice

Author : Ellen A. Rhoades
ISBN :
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 33. 70 MB
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Since the first edition of this text, families across English-speaking nations have become more diverse and complex, more early intervention practitioners have begun embracing the imperative for family-centered early intervention, and increasingly more families and their young children with hearing loss have been requesting the services of auditory-verbal practitioners. This second edition, designed to be more reader-friendly, is a cross-cultural collaboration of expert family-centered practitioners that focus on how families and their infants and toddlers with hearing loss might best be served. Toward that end, the authors in this book examine the process toward certification in the field of auditory-verbal practice and the empirical bases as well as research outcomes pertaining to this global-wide practice. The development of a systemic and positive perspective, critical for practitioners who must evolve to serve more than just the parent-child dyad, is analyzed. Theoretical and practical bases of family-based models and parent-child interactions are explored. Issues related to diverse family structures and interactions are considered across chapters. The family decision-making process and family-centered strategies that can be effectively implemented by practitioners are discussed in detail. Implementing and evaluating routines-based interventions within natural environments as well as ways of engaging families with current technologies are included in this comprehensive resource. This book provides early intervention service providers with thought-provoking insights into the challenges and opportunities that affect 21st century auditory-verbal practice.

Nurturing Language And Learning

Author : Patricia Elizabeth Spencer
ISBN : 9780190465360
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 36. 28 MB
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In what ways is development of deaf and hard-of-hearing babies and toddlers like that of those with typical hearing? What specific challenges are likely to be faced by child and parent - and when are they most likely to occur? What modifications in parenting and caregiver interaction can help or avoid these challenges? A strong, supportive foundation for optimal learning is achieved from early, positive, and responsive experiences. With Nurturing Language and Learning, Patricia Elizabeth Spencer and Lynne Sanford Koester provide the expert information and guidelines needed for professionals and parents in order to build that critical foundation.

Flourishing In Emerging Adulthood

Author : Laura M. Padilla-Walker
ISBN : 9780190260637
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 81. 94 MB
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Flourishing in Emerging Adulthood highlights the third decade of life as a time in which individuals have diverse opportunities for positive development. There is mounting evidence that this time period, at least for a significant majority, is a unique developmental period in which positive development is fostered. Dr. Lene Arnett Jensen highlights the importance of this work in an engaging foreword, and chapters are written by leading scholars in diverse disciplines who address various aspects of flourishing. They discuss multiple aspects of positive development including how young people flourish in key areas of emerging adulthood (e.g., identity, love, work, worldviews), the various unique opportunities afforded to young people to flourish, how flourishing might look different around the world, and how flourishing can occur in the face of challenge. Most chapters are accompanied by first-person essays written by a range of emerging adults who exemplify the aspect of flourishing denoted in that chapter and make note of how choices and experiences have helped them transition to adulthood. Taken together, this innovative collection provides rich evidence and examples of how young people are flourishing as a group and as individuals in a variety of settings and circumstances. This unique resource will be useful to students, faculty, professionals, clinicians, and university personnel who work with young adults or who study development during emerging adulthood.

Deaf Mental Health Care

Author : Neil S. Glickman
ISBN : 9781136682780
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 72. 96 MB
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This volume presents a state of the art account of the clinical specialty of mental health care of deaf people. Drawing upon some of the leading clinicians, teachers, administrators, and researchers in this field from the United States and Great Britain, it addresses critical issues from this specialty such as Deaf/hearing cross cultural dynamics as they impact treatment organizations Clinical and interpreting work with deaf persons with widely varying language abilities Adaptations of best practices in inpatient, residential, trauma, and substance abuse treatment for deaf persons Overcoming administrative barriers to establishing statewide continua of care University training of clinical specialists The interplay of clinical and forensic responses to deaf people who commit crimes An agenda of priorities for Deaf mental health research Each chapter contains numerous clinical case studies and places a heavy emphasis on providing practical intervention strategies in an interesting, easy to read style. All mental health professionals who work with deaf individuals will find this to be an invaluable resource for creating and maintaining culturally affirmative treatment with this population.

Assessing Literacy In Deaf Individuals

Author : Donna Morere
ISBN : 9781461452690
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 20. 22 MB
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Humans’ development of literacy has been a recent focus of intense research from the reading, cognitive, and neuroscience fields. But for individuals who are deaf—who rely greatly on their visual skills for language and learning—the findings don’t necessarily apply, leaving theoretical and practical gaps in approaches to their education. Assessing Literacy in Deaf Individuals: Neurocognitive Measurement and Predictors narrows these gaps by introducing the VL2 Toolkit, a comprehensive test battery for assessing the academic skills and cognitive functioning of deaf persons who use sign language. Skills measured include executive functioning, memory, reading, visuospatial ability, writing fluency, math, and expressive and receptive language. Comprehensive data are provided for each, with discussion of validity and reliability issues as well as ethical and legal questions involved in the study. And background chapters explain how the Toolkit was compiled, describing the procedures of the study, its rationale, and salient characteristics of its participants. This notable book: Describes each Toolkit instrument and the psychometric properties it measures. Presents detailed findings on test measures and relationships between skills. Discusses issues and challenges relating to visual representations of English, including fingerspelling and lipreading. Features a factor analysis of the Toolkit measures to identify underlying cognitive structures in deaf learners. Reviews trends in American Sign Language assessment. Assessing Literacy in Deaf Individuals is an essential reference for researchers, graduate students, clinicians, and other professionals working in the field of deafness and deaf education across in such areas as clinical child and school psychology, audiology, and linguistics.

The Role Of Values In Careers

Author : Mark Pope
ISBN : 9781623966485
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 55. 64 MB
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Values are of critical importance in the practice of career counseling as evidenced by the pervasive use of values surveys and values card sorts by career counselors, vocational and counseling psychologists, career development facilitators, career coaches, and other career development practitioners. The purpose of this book is to provide practitioners, faculty, and researchers in vocational psychology and career counseling with a foundational tool to guide their work. This book focuses on the critical role that values play in a person’s career, addressing values from a broad array of perspectives, including cultural and international perspectives, to illuminate the place of values within vocational psychology and career development. The book will be directed primarily toward psychology and counselor education faculty who teach advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in vocational psychology, career development, career assessment, and career counseling. Although there is a range of readership (undergraduate and graduate students as well as professionals already in the field), the authors understand the differences in reading level and agree to write for all levels.

40 Days Of Dating

Author : Jessica Walsh
ISBN : 9781613127155
Genre : Self-Help
File Size : 58. 74 MB
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When New York–based graphic designers and long-time friends Timothy Goodman and Jessica Walsh found themselves single at the same time, they decided to try an experiment. The old adage says that it takes 40 days to change a habit—could the same be said for love? So they agreed to date each other for 40 days, record their experiences in questionnaires, photographs, videos, texts, and artworks, and post the material on a website they would create for this purpose. What began as a small experiment between two friends became an Internet sensation, drawing 5 million unique (and obsessed) visitors from around the globe to their site and their story since it was launched in July 2013. 40 Days of Dating: An Experiment is a beautifully designed, expanded look at the experiment and the results, including a great deal of material that never made it onto the site, such as who they were as friends and individuals before the 40 days and who they have become since. Note: 40 Days of Dating has a special binding that allows it to open very flat by attaching the endpapers to the inside covers.

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