the promised land the great black migration and how it changed america

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The Promised Land

Author : Nicholas Lemann
ISBN : 9780307764874
Genre : History
File Size : 87. 93 MB
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A New York Times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A definitive book on American history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Promised Land

Author : Nicholas Lemann
ISBN : 9780679733478
Genre : History
File Size : 20. 76 MB
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A look at the flight of African Americans from the rural South to the urban North between 1940 and 1970 presents the migrants' stories about everything from rural sharecropper shacks to urban housing projects. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.

The Big Test

Author : Nicholas Lemann
ISBN : 0374527512
Genre : Education
File Size : 86. 70 MB
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Surveys the history of educational testing in the United States, and discusses the ideas, the people, and the politics behind the system.

The Warmth Of Other Suns

Author : Isabel Wilkerson
ISBN : 9780679444329
Genre : History
File Size : 54. 82 MB
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An epic history covering the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s chronicles the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.

Black Exodus

Author : Alferdteen Harrison
ISBN : 0878056092
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 33. 91 MB
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What were the causes that motivated legions of black southerners to immigrate to the North? What was the impact upon the land they left and upon the communities they chose for their new homes? Perhaps no pattern of migration has changed America's socioeconomic structure more than this mass exodus of African Americans in the first half of the twentieth century. Because of this exodus, the South lost not only a huge percentage of its inhabitants to northern cities like Chicago, New York, Detroit, and Philadelphia but also its supply of cheap labor. Fleeing from racial injustice and poverty, southern blacks took their culture north with them and transformed northern urban centers with their churches, social institutions, and ways of life. In Black Exodus eight noted scholars consider the causes that stimulated the migration and examine the far-reaching results.

Land Of Hope

Author : James R. Grossman
ISBN : 9780226309958
Genre : History
File Size : 79. 87 MB
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Grossman’s rich, detailed analysis of black migration to Chicago during World War I and its aftermath brilliantly captures the cultural meaning of the movement.

Competition In The Promised Land

Author : Leah Platt Boustan
ISBN : 9781400882977
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 66. 25 MB
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From 1940 to 1970, nearly four million black migrants left the American rural South to settle in the industrial cities of the North and West. Competition in the Promised Land provides a comprehensive account of the long-lasting effects of the influx of black workers on labor markets and urban space in receiving areas. Traditionally, the Great Black Migration has been lauded as a path to general black economic progress. Leah Boustan challenges this view, arguing instead that the migration produced winners and losers within the black community. Boustan shows that migrants themselves gained tremendously, more than doubling their earnings by moving North. But these new arrivals competed with existing black workers, limiting black–white wage convergence in Northern labor markets and slowing black economic growth. Furthermore, many white households responded to the black migration by relocating to the suburbs. White flight was motivated not only by neighborhood racial change but also by the desire on the part of white residents to avoid participating in the local public services and fiscal obligations of increasingly diverse cities. Employing historical census data and state-of-the-art econometric methods, Competition in the Promised Land revises our understanding of the Great Black Migration and its role in the transformation of American society.

The Promised Land

Author : Mary Antin
ISBN : 9780486320663
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 90. 15 MB
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This 1912 classic of the Jewish-American immigrant experience, whose author arrived in Boston from Russia as a child in the 1890s, offers a moving narrative of Old and New World cultures.

Bound For The Promised Land

Author : Milton C. Sernett
ISBN : 0822319934
Genre : History
File Size : 33. 28 MB
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DIVDiscusses the migration of African-Americans from the south to the north after WWI through the 1940s and the effect this had on African-American churches and religions./div

Redemption

Author : Nicholas Lemann
ISBN : 9781429923613
Genre : History
File Size : 81. 99 MB
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A century after Appomattox, the civil rights movement won full citizenship for black Americans in the South. It should not have been necessary: by 1870 those rights were set in the Constitution. This is the story of the terrorist campaign that took them away. Nicholas Lemann opens his extraordinary new book with a riveting account of the horrific events of Easter 1873 in Colfax, Louisiana, where a white militia of Confederate veterans-turned-vigilantes attacked the black community there and massacred hundreds of people in a gruesome killing spree. This was the start of an insurgency that changed the course of American history: for the next few years white Southern Democrats waged a campaign of political terrorism aiming to overturn the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments and challenge President Grant'ssupport for the emergent structures of black political power. The remorseless strategy of well-financed "White Line" organizations was to create chaos and keep blacks from voting out of fear for their lives and livelihoods. Redemption is the first book to describe in uncompromising detail this organized racial violence, which reached its apogee in Mississippi in 1875. Lemann bases his devastating account on a wealth of military records, congressional investigations, memoirs, press reports, and the invaluable papers of Adelbert Ames, the war hero from Maine who was Mississippi's governor at the time. When Ames pleaded with Grant for federal troops who could thwart the white terrorists violently disrupting Republican political activities, Grant wavered, and the result was a bloody, corrupt election in which Mississippi was "redeemed"—that is, returned to white control. Redemption makes clear that this is what led to the death of Reconstruction—and of the rights encoded in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. We are still living with the consequences.

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