the train to crystal city fdrs secret prisoner exchange program and americas only family internment camp during world war ii

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The Train To Crystal City

Author : Jan Jarboe Russell
ISBN : 9781451693676
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 68. 91 MB
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"The ... story of a secret FDR-approved prisoner exchange program run during World War II from Crystal City, Texas, an American internment camp where thousands of families were incarcerated"--Jacket flap.

The Train To Crystal City

Author : Jan Jarboe Russell
ISBN : 9781451693683
Genre : History
File Size : 35. 55 MB
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The New York Times bestselling dramatic and never-before-told story of a secret FDR-approved American internment camp in Texas during World War II: “A must-read….The Train to Crystal City is compelling, thought-provoking, and impossible to put down” (Star-Tribune, Minneapolis). During World War II, trains delivered thousands of civilians from the United States and Latin America to Crystal City, Texas. The trains carried Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and their American-born children. The only family internment camp during the war, Crystal City was the center of a government prisoner exchange program called “quiet passage.” Hundreds of prisoners in Crystal City were exchanged for other more ostensibly important Americans—diplomats, businessmen, soldiers, and missionaries—behind enemy lines in Japan and Germany. “In this quietly moving book” (The Boston Globe), Jan Jarboe Russell focuses on two American-born teenage girls, uncovering the details of their years spent in the camp; the struggles of their fathers; their families’ subsequent journeys to war-devastated Germany and Japan; and their years-long attempt to survive and return to the United States, transformed from incarcerated enemies to American loyalists. Their stories of day-to-day life at the camp, from the ten-foot high security fence to the armed guards, daily roll call, and censored mail, have never been told. Combining big-picture World War II history with a little-known event in American history, The Train to Crystal City reveals the war-time hysteria against the Japanese and Germans in America, the secrets of FDR’s tactics to rescue high-profile POWs in Germany and Japan, and above all, “is about identity, allegiance, and home, and the difficulty of determining the loyalties that lie in individual human hearts” (Texas Observer).

Lady Bird

Author : Jan Jarboe Russell
ISBN : 9781501152887
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 74. 7 MB
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A revealing biography of Lady Bird Johnson exposes startling insights into her marriage to Lyndon Baines Johnson—and her unexpectedly strong impact on his presidency. Long obscured by her husband’s shadow, Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson emerges in this first comprehensive biography as a figure of surprising influence and the centering force for LBJ, a man who suffered from extreme mood swings and desperately needed someone to help control his darker impulses. Expertly researched and written, Lady Bird draws from rare conversations with the former First Lady and from interviews with key members of Johnson’s inner circle of friends, family, and advisers. With chapters such as “Motherless Child,” “A Ten-Week Affair,” and “LBJ’s Midlife Crisis,” Lady Bird sheds light on Mrs. Johnson’s childhood, on her amazing acumen as a businesswoman, and on the central role she played in her husband’s life and political career. A vital link to the Kennedys during LBJ’s uneasy tenure as vice president and a voice of conscience on civil rights, Jan Jarboe Russell reveals Lady Bird as a political force. In this intimate portrait, Russell shows us the private Lady Bird—not only a passionate conservationist but a remarkable woman who greatly influenced her husband, his administration, and the country.

We Were Not The Enemy

Author : Heidi Gurcke Donald
ISBN : 9780595393336
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 66. 76 MB
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The United States clandestinely funds the operation of a huge prison in Cuba. Men, women, and children are spirited away from their homes and imprisoned indefinitely. No charges are made; no legal counsel is allowed. Newspapers fill with stories of espionage and enemies. Current events? No. During World War II, the United States used tactics remarkably similar to those in use today against presumed terrorists. By 1939, President Franklin Roosevelt had covertly authorized J. Edgar Hoover's Secret Intelligence Service to begin surveillance of Axis nationals in Latin America. Believing that "all German nationals without exception [are] dangerous," the United States surreptitiously pressured Latin-American countries to arrest and deport more than four thousand civilians of German ethnicity to the United States. There, many languished in internment camps, while others were shipped to war-torn Germany. As my parents, German-born Werner Gurcke and his American wife, Starr, began their lives together in Costa Rica, he was falsely labeled one of the country's most dangerous enemy aliens. Soon she, too, was considered "dangerous to the safety of the United Nations." From newlyweds to parents, innocent civilians to dangerous enemies, prisoners to internees, We Were Not the Enemy tells their story.

Infamy

Author : Richard Reeves
ISBN : 9780805099393
Genre : History
File Size : 25. 9 MB
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A LOS ANGELES TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW EDITOR'S CHOICE • Bestselling author Richard Reeves provides an authoritative account of the internment of more than 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese aliens during World War II Less than three months after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and inflamed the nation, President Roosevelt signed an executive order declaring parts of four western states to be a war zone operating under military rule. The U.S. Army immediately began rounding up thousands of Japanese-Americans, sometimes giving them less than 24 hours to vacate their houses and farms. For the rest of the war, these victims of war hysteria were imprisoned in primitive camps. In Infamy, the story of this appalling chapter in American history is told more powerfully than ever before. Acclaimed historian Richard Reeves has interviewed survivors, read numerous private letters and memoirs, and combed through archives to deliver a sweeping narrative of this atrocity. Men we usually consider heroes-FDR, Earl Warren, Edward R. Murrow-were in this case villains, but we also learn of many Americans who took great risks to defend the rights of the internees. Most especially, we hear the poignant stories of those who spent years in "war relocation camps," many of whom suffered this terrible injustice with remarkable grace. Racism, greed, xenophobia, and a thirst for revenge: a dark strand in the American character underlies this story of one of the most shameful episodes in our history. But by recovering the past, Infamy has given voice to those who ultimately helped the nation better understand the true meaning of patriotism.

Looking Like The Enemy

Author : Mary Matsuda Gruenewald
ISBN : 0939165538
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 62. 50 MB
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"When Mary Matsuda Gruenewald was seventeen years old she and her family were evacuated to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, along with nearly 120,000 other people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast. She tells her story of imprisonment from the heart and mind of a woman now eighty years old who experienced the challenges and wounds of internment at a crucial point in her young life. She captures the emotional and psychological essence of growing up in the midst of this profound dislocation and injustice. No longer willing to stay within what she describes as "the self-imposed barbed-wire fences built around my experiences in the camps," Gruenewald breaks her silence as a Nisei with the publication of her first book."--BOOK JACKET.

Stalag Wisconsin

Author : Betty Cowley
ISBN : 187856983X
Genre : History
File Size : 74. 58 MB
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Comprehensive look inside Wisconsin's 38 branch camps that held 20,000 Nazi and Japanese prisoners of war during World War II.

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