the united states and the international criminal court national security and international law

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The United States And The International Criminal Court

Author : Sarah B. Sewall
ISBN : 0742501353
Genre : Law
File Size : 86. 57 MB
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A growing international consensus supports the idea of holding individuals responsible for the most egregious violations of human rights such as genocide. This consensus lies behind the recent efforts to create an International Criminal Court (ICe. The United States, however, has refused to support the ICC, citing concerns that the Court may pose a threat to national security. This volume brings legal, historical, military, and political perspectives to an examination of U.S. concerns about the ICC. The contributors assess not only the potential national security risks that would be associated with a functioning ICC, but also the potential costs to U.S. security that may result from opposing the Court's creation.

V Lkerrecht

Author : Georg Dahm
ISBN : 389949024X
Genre : International law
File Size : 54. 56 MB
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Die Formen Des V Lkerrechtlichen Handelns Die Inhaltliche Ordnung Der Internationalen Gemeinschaft

Author :
ISBN : 9783110906967
Genre : Law
File Size : 32. 96 MB
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An Introduction To The International Criminal Court

Author : William A. Schabas
ISBN : 9781316883235
Genre : Law
File Size : 54. 21 MB
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The International Criminal Court ushered in a new era in the protection of human rights. The Court prosecutes genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression when national justice systems are either unwilling or unable to do so themselves. This fifth edition of the seminal text describes a Court which is no longer in its infancy; the Court is currently examining situations that involve more than twenty countries in every continent of the planet. This book considers the difficulties in the Court's troubled relationship with Africa, the vagaries of the position of the United States, and the challenges the Court may face as it confronts conflicts around the world. It also reviews the history of international criminal prosecution and the Rome Statute. Written by a leading commentator, it is an authoritative and up-to-date introduction to the legal issues involved in the creation and operation of the Court.

National Security And International Criminal Justice

Author : Herwig Roggemann
ISBN : 9041118160
Genre : Law
File Size : 21. 75 MB
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USA. By Stephen C. Thaman.

Means To An End

Author : Lee Feinstein
ISBN : 9780815721710
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 78. 65 MB
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The International Criminal Court remains a sensitive issue in U.S. foreign policy circles. It was agreed to at the tail end of the Clinton administration, but with serious reservations. In 2002 the Bush administration ceremoniously reversed course and "unsigned" the Rome Statute that had established the Court. But recent developments in Washington and elsewhere indicate that the United States may be moving toward de facto acceptance of the Court and active cooperation in its mission. In Means to an End, Lee Feinstein and Tod Lindberg reassess the relationship of the United States and the ICC, as well as American policy toward international justice more broadly. Praise for the hardcover edition of Means to an End "Books of this sort are all too rare. Two experienced policy intellectuals, one liberal, one conservative, have come together to find common ground on a controversial foreign policy issue.... The book is short, but it goes a long way toward clearing the ideological air." — Foreign Affairs "A well-researched and timely contribution to the debate over America's proper relationship to the International Criminal Court. Rigorous in its arguments and humane in its conclusions, the volume is an indispensable guide for scholars and policymakers alike." —Madeleine K. Albright, former U.S. Secretary of State "Two of our nation's leading authorities on preventing atrocities have joined to make a convincing argument that closer cooperation with the International Criminal Court will help promote human rights and the values on which America was founded." —Angelina Jolie, co-chair, Jolie-Pitt Foundation

Is A Un International Criminal Court In The Us National Interest

Author : United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Foreign Relations. Subcommittee on International Operations
ISBN : 0160577926
Genre : Law
File Size : 30. 8 MB
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Justice Beyond The Hague

Author : David A. Kaye
ISBN : 9780876094440
Genre : Law
File Size : 83. 88 MB
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When the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was established more than twenty years ago, the international community had little experience prosecuting the perpetrators of genocide, war crimes, and other atrocities. Unfortunately, there has been ample opportunity to build expertise in the intervening decades; ad hoc tribunals have been established to address past crimes in Cambodia and Sierra Leone, and a formal International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) was convened in the aftermath of Rwanda's 1994 genocide. Since 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has assumed responsibility for new prosecutions, pursuing war criminals in countries unable or unwilling to bring them to justice domestically. Yet, after more than two decades of experience, the limits of these courts' capabilities are becoming clear. While they have brought some senior leaders to justice, the scope of the courts' budgets and their enquiries can never reach all--or even most--perpetrators of atrocities. They are physically far removed from the scenes of the crimes they are prosecuting, cannot compel evidence or conduct independent investigations, and are vulnerable to changes in funding and international political support. To overcome these and other difficulties, the international community must place greater emphasis on strengthening the national justice systems of the countries where atrocities have occurred. In this Council Special Report, David Kaye examines existing international justice mechanisms, analyzes how they have succeeded and where they have failed, and explains what reforms national legal systems will require to secure just and peaceful outcomes. Cognizant of the myriad individual challenges facing countries experiencing or emerging from violent conflict, Kaye nevertheless identifies a core set of common needs: political pressure on governments reluctant to prosecute perpetrators; assistance in building legal frameworks and training legal officials; support for investigations, including forensic analysis and security sector reform; and creating belief in the justice system among the local population. To these ends, Kaye outlines several recommendations for U.S. policymakers and their governmental and nongovernmental partners worldwide. Beginning in the United States, Kaye argues that Washington should expand diplomatic and financial support for national justice systems and appoint a senior official to oversee initiatives from the State Department, Justice Department, USAID, and other agencies. Abroad, he calls for the secretary of state to organize a donor conference to agree on funding priorities and responsibilities for the international community, and to establish a coordinating body to ensure that support for national-level justice systems is properly coordinated and informed by best practices. Justice Beyond The Hague provides important insights into the strengths and limitations of current international justice mechanisms. It makes a clear case for increasing support to national legal systems and outlines a variety of ways that the U.S. government can improve and coordinate its aid with others. While there will always be a place for international courts in countries that cannot or will not prosecute perpetrators themselves, this Council Special Report successfully argues that domestic systems can and should play a more meaningful role.

The International Criminal Court Controversy

Author : Philipp Meissner
ISBN : 382588371X
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 35. 57 MB
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The United States' opposition to the International Criminal Court (ICC) has developed into the epitome of fierce controversy concerning the international legal order in the 21st century. This volume represents an analysis of both the legal objections asserted by the involved U.S. administrations as well as a set of political motives the author considers likely to underlie their opposition. Fostering mutual understanding is the pre-condition for achieving an ease of tension in the future - which is in the very interest not only of the ICC and its States Parties, but also of the U.S.

Politicizing The International Criminal Court

Author : Steven C. Roach
ISBN : 0742541045
Genre : Law
File Size : 79. 88 MB
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The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in July 1998 has attracted growing interest in the evolving role of politics in international law. Steven C. Roach's innovative and systematic work on the political and ethical dimensions of the ICC is the first comprehensive attempt to situate the politics of the ICC both theoretically and practically. Linking the ICC's internal politicization with its formative development, Roach provides a unique understanding of this institution's capacity to play a constructive role in global politics. He argues that an internal form of politicization will allow the ICC to counter outside efforts to politicize it, whether this involves the political agenda of a state hegemon or the geopolitical interests of U. N. Security Council permanent members. Steering a new path between conventional approaches that stress the formal link between legitimacy and legal neutrality, and unconventional approaches that treat legitimacy and politics as inextricable elements of a repressive international legal order, Roach formulates the concept of political legalism, which calls for a self-directed and engaged application of the legal rules and principles of the ICC Statute. Politicizing the International Criminal Court is a must-read for scholars, students, and policymakers interested in the dynamics of this important international institution.

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