working toward whiteness how america s immigrants became white the strange journey from ellis island to the suburbs

Download Book Working Toward Whiteness How America S Immigrants Became White The Strange Journey From Ellis Island To The Suburbs in PDF format. You can Read Online Working Toward Whiteness How America S Immigrants Became White The Strange Journey From Ellis Island To The Suburbs here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Working Toward Whiteness

Author : David R. Roediger
ISBN : 078672210X
Genre : History
File Size : 65. 68 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 625
Read : 219

Get This Book


At the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history, David R. Roediger is the author of the now-classic The Wages of Whiteness, a study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, he continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how American ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-once occupied a confused racial status in their new country. They eventually became part of white America thanks to the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants--the racist real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods--Roediger explores the murky realities of race in twentieth-century America. A masterful history by an award-winning writer, Working Toward Whiteness charts the strange transformation of these new immigrants into the "white ethnics" of America today.

Working Toward Whiteness

Author : David R. Roediger
ISBN : 0465070736
Genre : History
File Size : 46. 60 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 199
Read : 174

Get This Book


By an award-winning historian of race and labor, a definitive account of how Ellis Island immigrants became accepted as cultural insiders in America

Working Toward Whiteness

Author : David R. Roediger
ISBN : 9780786722105
Genre : History
File Size : 88. 48 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 474
Read : 1024

Get This Book


At the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history, David R. Roediger is the author of the now-classic The Wages of Whiteness, a study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, he continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how American ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-once occupied a confused racial status in their new country. They eventually became part of white America thanks to the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants--the racist real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods--Roediger explores the murky realities of race in twentieth-century America. A masterful history by an award-winning writer, Working Toward Whiteness charts the strange transformation of these new immigrants into the "white ethnics" of America today.

Roots Too

Author : Matthew Frye JACOBSON
ISBN : 9780674039063
Genre : History
File Size : 32. 16 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 503
Read : 505

Get This Book


In the 1970s, white ethnics mobilized around a new version of the epic tale of plucky immigrants making their way in the New World through the sweat of their brow. Although this turn to ethnicity was for many an individual search for familial and psychological identity, Roots Too establishes a broader white social and political consensus arising in response to the political language of the Civil Rights movement.

Are Italians White

Author : Jennifer Guglielmo
ISBN : 9781136062421
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77. 24 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 133
Read : 300

Get This Book


This dazzling collection of original essays from some of the country's leading thinkers asks the rather intriguing question - Are Italians White? Each piece carefully explores how, when and why whiteness became important to Italian Americans, and the significance of gender, class and nation to racial identity.

Cousins And Strangers

Author : Jose C. Moya
ISBN : 0520921534
Genre : History
File Size : 47. 6 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 882
Read : 436

Get This Book


More than four million Spaniards came to the Western Hemisphere between the mid-nineteenth century and the Great Depression. Unlike that of most other Europeans, their major destination was Argentina, not the United States. Studies of these immigrants—mostly laborers and peasants—have been scarce in comparison with studies of other groups of smaller size and lesser influence. Presenting original research within a broad comparative framework, Jose C. Moya fills a considerable gap in our knowledge of immigration to Argentina, one of the world's primary "settler" societies. Moya moves deftly between micro- and macro-analysis to illuminate the immigration phenomenon. A wealth of primary sources culled from dozens of immigrant associations, national and village archives, and interviews with surviving participants in Argentina and Spain inform his discussion of the origins of Spanish immigration, residence patterns, community formation, labor, and cultural cognitive aspects of the immigration process. In addition, he provides valuable material on other immigrant groups in Argentina and gives a balanced critique of major issues in migration studies.

The Wages Of Whiteness

Author : David R. Roediger
ISBN : 1859842402
Genre : History
File Size : 63. 19 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 958
Read : 1249

Get This Book


THE WAGES OF WHITENESS provides an original study of the formative years of working-class racism in the United States. In an Afterword to this second edition, Roediger discusses recent studies of whiteness and the changing face of labor itself--then surveys criticism of his work. He accepts the views of some critics but challenges others.

How The Irish Became White

Author : Noel Ignatiev
ISBN : 9781135070694
Genre : History
File Size : 49. 64 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 881
Read : 1269

Get This Book


'...from time to time a study comes along that truly can be called ‘path breaking,’ ‘seminal,’ ‘essential,’ a ‘must read.’ How the Irish Became White is such a study.' John Bracey, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachussetts, Amherst The Irish came to America in the eighteenth century, fleeing a homeland under foreign occupation and a caste system that regarded them as the lowest form of humanity. In the new country – a land of opportunity – they found a very different form of social hierarchy, one that was based on the color of a person’s skin. Noel Ignatiev’s 1995 book – the first published work of one of America’s leading and most controversial historians – tells the story of how the oppressed became the oppressors; how the new Irish immigrants achieved acceptance among an initially hostile population only by proving that they could be more brutal in their oppression of African Americans than the nativists. This is the story of How the Irish Became White.

Hammer And Hoe

Author : Robin D. G. Kelley
ISBN : 9781469625492
Genre : History
File Size : 85. 11 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 704
Read : 569

Get This Book


A groundbreaking contribution to the history of the "long Civil Rights movement," Hammer and Hoe tells the story of how, during the 1930s and 40s, Communists took on Alabama's repressive, racist police state to fight for economic justice, civil and political rights, and racial equality. The Alabama Communist Party was made up of working people without a Euro-American radical political tradition: devoutly religious and semiliterate black laborers and sharecroppers, and a handful of whites, including unemployed industrial workers, housewives, youth, and renegade liberals. In this book, Robin D. G. Kelley reveals how the experiences and identities of these people from Alabama's farms, factories, mines, kitchens, and city streets shaped the Party's tactics and unique political culture. The result was a remarkably resilient movement forged in a racist world that had little tolerance for radicals. After discussing the book's origins and impact in a new preface written for this twenty-fifth-anniversary edition, Kelley reflects on what a militantly antiracist, radical movement in the heart of Dixie might teach contemporary social movements confronting rampant inequality, police violence, mass incarceration, and neoliberalism.

How Jews Became White Folks And What That Says About Race In America

Author : Karen Brodkin
ISBN : 081352590X
Genre : History
File Size : 50. 6 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 204
Read : 1172

Get This Book


Recounts how Jews assimilated into, and became accepted by, mainstream white society in the later twentieth century, as they lost their working-class orientation

Top Download:

Best Books