america divided the civil war of the 1960s

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America Divided

Author : Maurice Isserman
ISBN : 9780195091908
Genre : History
File Size : 57. 77 MB
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Explores the tumultuous decade in American history, covering such topics as civil rights, Vietnam, the assasination of Martin Luther King Jr. and Bobby Kennedy, the war on poverty, marijuana usage, and the policies of Presidents Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon.

America Divided

Author : Maurice Isserman
ISBN : UCSC:32106018262839
Genre : History
File Size : 47. 25 MB
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Explores the tumultuous decade in American history, covering such topics as civil rights, Vietnam, the assasination of Martin Luther King Jr. and Bobby Kennedy, the war on poverty, marijuana usage, and the policies of Presidents Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixo

Southern Civil Religions In Conflict

Author : Andrew Michael Manis
ISBN : 0865547963
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 46. 13 MB
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Back in print, revised, and enlarged to bring the discussion to the present, Manis shows how two conflicting civil religions emerged in the South during the civil rights movement, each with its own understanding of America's calling and destiny as a nation. Using black and white Baptists in the South as case studies, Manis interprets the civil rights movement as a civil religious conflict between southerners with opposing understandings of America. Originally published in 1987, this new, expanded edition further argues that the civil rights movement and its opposition, with their conflicting images and hopes for America, foreshadowed the ongoing "culture wars" of recent days. In the aftermath of World War II, citizens of every region drew together to affirm their common inheritance as a people and to celebrate the nation's military and moral victories. Such triumphs seemed to confirm America as a beacon to the nations, a "city on a hill." When America and particularly the South turned inward to think about "the American dilemma" of race, the South became a battlefield of conflicting civil faiths. The growing civil rights movement, calling on the nation to "live out the true meaning of its creed, " revealed within the South two separate civic creeds -- one based on freedom by law and equality under God; the other finding in the Constitution a guarantee of individual rights and in the Bible a divine sanction of segregation. Manis explores the southern reaction to civil rights through the words and actions of black and white Baptists, ministers, and laypersons whose rhetoric embodied the conflicting civil religions in the South. Responding to the Supreme Court's ruling in Brown v. Boardof Education, both black and white Baptists urged their fellow citizens to answer God's summons and help bring America to its God-given destiny. But as Brown gave way to the events of the civil rights movement, the segregationist dream of the Southland remaining "white man's country" was increasingly challenged as African Americans began, more militantly and more successfully, to claim the historic promise of the nation. Tracing the civil religious implications of the 1950s, Manis shows that as the civil rights movement divided Americans, desegregation became a crucial symbol for Americans who saw the nation as a land of equality and inclusion, as well as for Americans who continue to view America as properly and predominantly white and Protestant. In two new chapters, Manis connects this earlier conflict over civil religion and civil rights with what sociologist James D. Hunter called the "culture wars." In contrast to Hunter and others who have commented on it, Manis views the culture wars as centrally about the problem of race and difference in American life. What has broadened into partisan conflict about social issues such as prayer in schools, abortion, and family values, began as and largely remains at heart the question first raised by the civil rights debate: How racially diverse should America be?

America Divided

Author : Judith C. Isserman
ISBN : 1428827927
Genre : Education
File Size : 44. 61 MB
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Studyguide For America Divided

Author : Cram101 Textbook Reviews
ISBN : 1428827927
Genre :
File Size : 84. 47 MB
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Never HIGHLIGHT a Book Again! Virtually all of the testable terms, concepts, persons, places, and events from the textbook are included. Cram101 Just the FACTS101 studyguides give all of the outlines, highlights, notes, and quizzes for your textbook with optional online comprehensive practice tests. Only Cram101 is Textbook Specific. Accompanys: 9780195160468 9780195160475 .

The Columbia Guide To America In The 1960s

Author : David Farber
ISBN : 9780231518079
Genre : History
File Size : 89. 50 MB
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The 1960s continue to be the subject of passionate debate and political controversy, a touchstone in struggles over the meaning of the American past and the direction of the American future. Amid the polemics and the myths, making sense of the Sixties and its legacies presents a challenge. This book is for all those who want to take it on. Because there are so many facets to this unique and transformative era, this volume offers multiple approaches and perspectives. The first section gives a lively narrative overview of the decade's major policies, events, and cultural changes. The second presents ten original interpretative essays from prominent historians about significant and controversial issues from the Vietnam War to the sexual revolution, followed by a concise encyclopedia articles organized alphabetically. This section could stand as a reference work in itself and serves to supplement the narrative. Subsequent sections include short topical essays, special subjects, a brief chronology, and finally an extensive annotated bibliography with ample information on books, films, and electronic resources for further exploration. With interesting facts, statistics, and comparisons presented in almanac style as well as the expertise of prominent scholars, The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s is the most complete guide to an enduringly fascinating era.

The Music Has Gone Out Of The Movement

Author : David C. Carter
ISBN : 9781469606576
Genre : History
File Size : 49. 96 MB
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After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. In a famous speech at Howard University in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared that victory in the next battle for civil rights would be measured in "equal results" rather than equal rights and opportunities. It seemed that for a brief moment the White House and champions of racial equality shared the same objectives and priorities. Finding common ground proved elusive, however, in a climate of growing social and political unrest marked by urban riots, the Vietnam War, and resurgent conservatism. Examining grassroots movements and organizations and their complicated relationships with the federal government and state authorities between 1965 and 1968, David C. Carter takes readers through the inner workings of local civil rights coalitions as they tried to maintain strength within their organizations while facing both overt and subtle opposition from state and federal officials. He also highlights internal debates and divisions within the White House and the executive branch, demonstrating that the federal government's relationship to the movement and its major goals was never as clear-cut as the president's progressive rhetoric suggested. Carter reveals the complex and often tense relationships between the Johnson administration and activist groups advocating further social change, and he extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Hippies Indians And The Fight For Red Power

Author : Sherry L. Smith
ISBN : 9780199855599
Genre : History
File Size : 85. 68 MB
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This book explains how, and why, hippies, Quakers, Black Panthers, movie stars, housewives, and labor unions, to name a few, supported Indian demands for greater political power and separate cultural existence in the modern United States.

God Bless America

Author : Sheryl Kaskowitz
ISBN : 9780199919772
Genre : Music
File Size : 24. 66 MB
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The song 'God Bless America' has come to inhabit our collective consciousness. This book tells the fascinating story behind the song, from its composition in 1918 by Irving Berlin, to its first performance by Kate Smith in 1938, to its post 9/11 popularity.

Law And Order

Author : Michael W. Flamm
ISBN : 9780231509725
Genre : History
File Size : 90. 68 MB
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Law and Order offers a valuable new study of the political and social history of the 1960s. It presents a sophisticated account of how the issues of street crime and civil unrest enhanced the popularity of conservatives, eroded the credibility of liberals, and transformed the landscape of American politics. Ultimately, the legacy of law and order was a political world in which the grand ambitions of the Great Society gave way to grim expectations. In the mid-1960s, amid a pervasive sense that American society was coming apart at the seams, a new issue known as law and order emerged at the forefront of national politics. First introduced by Barry Goldwater in his ill-fated run for president in 1964, it eventually punished Lyndon Johnson and the Democrats and propelled Richard Nixon and the Republicans to the White House in 1968. In this thought-provoking study, Michael Flamm examines how conservatives successfully blamed liberals for the rapid rise in street crime and then skillfully used law and order to link the understandable fears of white voters to growing unease about changing moral values, the civil rights movement, urban disorder, and antiwar protests. Flamm documents how conservatives constructed a persuasive message that argued that the civil rights movement had contributed to racial unrest and the Great Society had rewarded rather than punished the perpetrators of violence. The president should, conservatives also contended, promote respect for law and order and contempt for those who violated it, regardless of cause. Liberals, Flamm argues, were by contrast unable to craft a compelling message for anxious voters. Instead, liberals either ignored the crime crisis, claimed that law and order was a racist ruse, or maintained that social programs would solve the "root causes" of civil disorder, which by 1968 seemed increasingly unlikely and contributed to a loss of faith in the ability of the government to do what it was above all sworn to do-protect personal security and private property.

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