britain and the narration of travel in the nineteenth century

Download Book Britain And The Narration Of Travel In The Nineteenth Century in PDF format. You can Read Online Britain And The Narration Of Travel In The Nineteenth Century here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Britain And The Narration Of Travel In The Nineteenth Century

Author : Kate Hill
ISBN : 9781134794737
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 61. 62 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 325
Read : 1319

Get This Book


Interrogating the multiple ways in which travel was narrated and mediated, by and in response to, nineteenth-century British travelers, this interdisciplinary collection examines to what extent these accounts drew on and developed existing tropes of travel. The three sections take up personal and intimate narratives that were not necessarily designed for public consumption, tales intended for a popular audience, and accounts that were more clearly linked with discourses and institutions of power, such as imperial processes of conquest and governance. Some narratives focus on the things the travelers carried, such as souvenirs from the battlefields of Britain’s imperial wars, while others show the complexity of Victorian dreams of the exotic. Still others offer a disapproving glimpse of Victorian mores through the eyes of indigenous peoples in contrast to the imperialist vision of British explorers. Swiss hotel registers, guest books, and guidebooks offer insights into the history of tourism, while new photographic technologies, the development of the telegraph system, and train travel transformed the visual, audial, and even the conjugal experience of travel. The contributors attend to issues of gender and ethnicity in essays on women travelers, South African travel narratives, and accounts of China during the Opium Wars, and analyze the influence of fictional travel narratives. Taken together, these essays show how these multiple narratives circulated, cross-fertilised, and reacted to one another to produce new narratives, new objects, and new modes of travel.

Nineteenth Century British Travelers In The New World

Author : Christine DeVine
ISBN : 9781317087304
Genre : Travel
File Size : 75. 79 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 508
Read : 1136

Get This Book


With cheaper publishing costs and the explosion of periodical publishing, the influence of New World travel narratives was greater during the nineteenth century than ever before, as they offered an understanding not only of America through British eyes, but also a lens though which nineteenth-century Britain could view itself. Despite the differences in purpose and method, the writers and artists discussed in Nineteenth-Century British Travelers in the New World-from Fanny Wright arriving in America in 1818 to the return of Henry James in 1904, and including Charles Dickens, Frances Trollope, Isabella Bird, Fanny Kemble, Harriet Martineau, and Robert Louis Stevenson among others, as well as artists such as Eyre Crowe-all contributed to the continued building of America as a construct for audiences at home. These travelers' stories and images thus presented an idea of America over which Britons could crow about their own supposed sophistication, and a democratic model through which to posit their own future, all of which suggests the importance of transatlantic travel writing and the ’idea of America’ to nineteenth-century Britain.

Visualizing Africa In Nineteenth Century British Travel Accounts

Author : Leila Koivunen
ISBN : 9781135856120
Genre : Art
File Size : 59. 46 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 169
Read : 687

Get This Book


This study examines and explains how British explorers visualized the African interior in the latter part of the nineteenth century, providing the first sustained analysis of the process by which this visual material was transformed into the illustrations in popular travel books. At that time, central Africa was, effectively, a blank canvas for Europeans, unknown and devoid of visual representations. While previous works have concentrated on exploring the stereotyped nature of printed imagery of Africa, this study examines the actual production process of images and the books in which they were published in order to demonstrate how, why, and by whom the images were manipulated. Thus, the main focus of the work is not on the aesthetic value of pictures, but in the activities, interaction, and situations that gave birth to them in both Africa and Europe.

Clio S Daughters

Author : Lynette Felber
ISBN : 0874139813
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 24. 57 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 101
Read : 1259

Get This Book


Exposes the reality behind the notion that nineteenth-century history was an exclusively male preserve. This work reveals the wealth of women's historical writings, demonstrating that Victorian domestic ideology did not prevent women from making history, featuring both as historical subjects and writers of history.

Gamle Norge And Nineteenth Century British Women Travellers In Norway

Author : Kathryn Walchester
ISBN : 9781783083657
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 62. 2 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 964
Read : 807

Get This Book


‘Gamle Norge and Nineteenth-Century British Women Travellers in Norway’ presents an account of the development of tourism in nineteenth-century Norway and considers the ways in which women travellers depicted their travels to the region. Tracing the motivations of various groups of women travellers, such as sportswomen, tourists and aristocrats, this book argues that in their writing, Norway forms a counterpoint to Victorian Britain: a place of freedom and possibility.

Nineteenth Century Transatlantic Reprinting And The Embodied Book

Author : Professor Jessica DeSpain
ISBN : 9781472405678
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 47. 37 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 927
Read : 789

Get This Book


Until the Chace Act in 1891, no international copyright law existed between Britain and the United States, which meant publishers were free to edit text, excerpt whole passages, add new illustrations, and substantially redesign a book's appearance. In spite of this ongoing process of transatlantic transformation of texts, the metaphor of the book as a physical embodiment of its author persisted. Jessica DeSpain's study of this period of textual instability examines how the physical book acted as a major form of cultural exchange between Britain and the United States that called attention to volatile texts and the identities they manifested. Focusing on four influential works—Charles Dickens's American Notes for General Circulation, Susan Warner's The Wide, Wide World, Fanny Kemble's Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation, and Walt Whitman's Democratic Vistas—DeSpain shows that for authors, readers, and publishers struggling with the unpredictability of the textual body, the physical book and the physical body became interchangeable metaphors of flux. At the same time, discourses of destabilized bodies inflected issues essential to transatlantic culture, including class, gender, religion, and slavery, while the practice of reprinting challenged the concepts of individual identity, personal property, and national identity.

Gender And Space In British Literature 1660 1820

Author : Dr Karen Gevirtz
ISBN : 9781472415103
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 89. 23 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 588
Read : 417

Get This Book


Between 1660 and 1820, Great Britain experienced significant structural transformations in class, politics, economy, print, and writing that produced new and varied spaces and with them, new and reconfigured concepts of gender. In mapping the relationship between gender and space in British literature of the period, this collection defines, charts, and explores new cartographies, both geographic and figurative. The contributors take up a variety of genres and discursive frameworks from this period, including poetry, the early novel, letters, and laboratory notebooks written by authors ranging from Aphra Behn, Hortense Mancini, and Isaac Newton to Frances Burney and Germaine de Staël. Arranged in three groups, Inside, Outside, and Borderlands, the essays conduct targeted literary analysis and explore the changing relationship between gender and different kinds of spaces in the long eighteenth century. In addition, a set of essays on Charlotte Smith’s novels and a set of essays on natural philosophy offer case studies for exploring issues of gender and space within larger fields, such as an author’s oeuvre or a particular discourse. Taken together, the essays demonstrate space’s agency as a complement to historical change as they explore how literature delineates the gendered redefinition, occupation, negotiation, inscription, and creation of new spaces, crucially contributing to the construction of new cartographies in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England.

Tracing The Connected Narrative

Author : Janice Cavell
ISBN : 9780802092809
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 63. 19 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 458
Read : 1231

Get This Book


Through extensive research and reference to new archival material, Cavell recaptures and examines the experience of nineteenth-century readers.

Journal Of Narrative Theory

Author :
ISBN : UOM:39015078272815
Genre : American literature
File Size : 37. 76 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 727
Read : 1067

Get This Book


"Cultural studies, critical theory, poststructuralism, feminist theory, new historicism".

The Delectable Negro

Author : Vincent Woodard
ISBN : 9781479849260
Genre : History
File Size : 29. 71 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 250
Read : 255

Get This Book


Winner of the 2015 LGBT Studies award presented by the Lambda Literary Foundation Scholars of US and transatlantic slavery have largely ignored or dismissed accusations that Black Americans were cannibalized. Vincent Woodard takes the enslaved person’s claims of human consumption seriously, focusing on both the literal starvation of the slave and the tropes of cannibalism on the part of the slaveholder, and further draws attention to the ways in which Blacks experienced their consumption as a fundamentally homoerotic occurrence. The Delectable Negro explores these connections between homoeroticism, cannibalism, and cultures of consumption in the context of American literature and US slave culture. Utilizing many staples of African American literature and culture, such as the slave narratives of OlaudahEquiano, Harriet Jacobs, and Frederick Douglass, as well as other less circulated materials like James L. Smith’s slave narrative, runaway slave advertisements, and numerous articles from Black newspapers published in the nineteenth century, Woodard traces the racial assumptions, political aspirations, gender codes, and philosophical frameworks that dictated both European and white American arousal towards Black males and hunger for Black male flesh. Woodard uses these texts to unpack how slaves struggled not only against social consumption, but also against endemic mechanisms of starvation and hunger designed to break them. He concludes with an examination of the controversial chain gang oral sex scene in Toni Morrison’s Beloved, suggesting that even at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century, we are still at a loss for language with which to describe Black male hunger within a plantation culture of consumption.

Top Download:

Best Books