factories of death

Download Book Factories Of Death in PDF format. You can Read Online Factories Of Death here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Factories Of Death

Author : Sheldon H. Harris
ISBN : 0415932149
Genre : History
File Size : 21. 24 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 244
Read : 495

Get This Book


"Factories of Death is the definitive story of Unit 731, the covert biological warfare group led by Ishii Shiro - the Josef Mengele of the Pacific Theater.

Factories Of Death

Author : Sheldon H. Harris
ISBN : 9781134827510
Genre : History
File Size : 42. 35 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 473
Read : 712

Get This Book


First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Six Legged Soldiers

Author : Jeffrey A. Lockwood
ISBN : 9780199733538
Genre : History
File Size : 64. 57 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 534
Read : 616

Get This Book


Examines how insects have been used as weapons in wartime conflicts throughout history, presenting as examples how scorpions were used in Roman times and hornets nests were used during the MIddle Ages in siege warfare and how insects have been used in Vietnam, China, and Korea.

The Treblinka Death Camp

Author : Chris Webb
ISBN : 9783838265469
Genre : History
File Size : 30. 13 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 199
Read : 169

Get This Book


This book is the definitive account of one of history's most infamous death factories, where approximately 800,000 people lost their lives. From the Nazis who ran it to the Ukrainian guards and maids, the Jewish survivors, and the Poles living in the camp's shadow -- this text represents every perspective. It provides biographies of the Jews who perished in the death camp as well as those who escaped from Treblinka in individual efforts or as part of the mass prisoner uprising on August 2, 1943. It also includes unique and previously unpublished sketches of the camp's ramp area and gas chamber, drawn by survivors.

Biological Weapons

Author : Jeanne Guillemin
ISBN : 9780231509176
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 43. 44 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 987
Read : 324

Get This Book


Until the events of September 11 and the anthrax attacks of 2001, biological weapons had never been a major public concern in the United States. Today, the possibility of their use by terrorists against Western states looms large as an international security concern. In Biological Weapons, Jeanne Guillemin provides a highly accessible and compelling account of the circumstances under which scientists, soldiers, and statesmen were able to mobilize resources for extensive biological weapons programs and also analyzes why such weapons, targeted against civilians, were never used in a major conflict. This book is essential for understanding the relevance of the historical restraints placed on the use of biological weapons for today's world. It serves as an excellent introduction to the problems biological weapons pose for contemporary policymakers and public officials, particularly in the United States. How can we best deter the use of such weapons? What are the resulting policies of the Department of Homeland Security? How can we constrain proliferation? Jeanne Guillemin wisely points out that these are vitally important questions for all Americans to consider and investigate—all the more so because the development of these weapons has been carried out under a veil of secrecy, with their frightening potential open to exploitation by the media and government. Public awareness through education can help calm fears in today's tension-filled climate and promote constructive political action to reduce the risks of a biological weapons catastrophe. Biological Weapons is required reading for every concerned citizen, government policymaker, public health official, and national security analyst who wants to understand this complex and timely issue.

A Death In Jerusalem

Author : Kati Marton
ISBN : 9780307800503
Genre : History
File Size : 89. 89 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 289
Read : 1209

Get This Book


On the evening of September 17, 1948, a car carrying Count Folke Bernadotte, the first United Nations–appointed mediator in the Middle East, traveled up a narrow Jerusalem street. As the car shifted gears for the climb toward the New City, an Israeli Army jeep nosed into the road, forcing Bernadotte’s car and the two following him to come to a full stop. From the jeep sprang three uniformed men clutching automatic weapons. In a moment that set the stage for a legacy of violence that has since characterized Arab-Israeli negotiations, Count Bernadotte was shot six times and killed. The assassins were never brought to justice. A Death in Jerusalem reveals the forces behind this assassination, the passion that first dictated the tactics of terrorism in Israel and that continue to shape the thinking and actions of those even now determined to block accommodation with the Palestinians. At its birth in 1948, the State of Israel was endangered as much by a fratricidal war between Jewish moderates and extremists as it was by the invading armies of its Arab neighbors. In the first test of its authority, the fledgling United Nations forged a temporary truce between Arabs and Jews and dispatched Count Bernadotte to negotiate a permanent peace. A Swede with a reputation for skillful negotiations with the Nazis for the release of prisoners, including Jewish concentration-camp victims, Bernadotte had seemed the ideal choice for mediator. But he was dangerously unversed in the Israeli underground’s passionate visions of a homeland restored to its biblical geographical proportions. To the Stern Gang, led by future Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, any concession of land was as threatening to Israel’s integrity as the Arabs’ invading armies. And the Sternists did not trust Count Bernadotte, whom they saw as threatening Israel’s claim to the holy city of Jerusalem. As Bernadotte prepared his plan for the allocation of disputed territory, the Stern Gang plotted his murder. Drawing on previously untapped sources, including Bernadotte’s family and former Stern Gang members, Kati Marton tells the vivid and haunting story of what propelled the Sternists, how they achieved their goal, and how and why the assassins were shielded from prosecution. From the Hardcover edition.

The Battle For Justice In Palestine

Author : Ali Abunimah
ISBN : 9781608463473
Genre : History
File Size : 49. 90 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 245
Read : 802

Get This Book


Efforts to achieve a "two-state solution" have finally collapsed, and the struggle for justice in Palestine is at a crossroads. As Israeli society lurches toward greater extremism, many ask where the struggle is headed. This book offers a clear analysis of this crossroads moment and looks forward with urgency down the path to a more hopeful future.

Auschwitz

Author : Laurence Rees
ISBN : 9781448140466
Genre : History
File Size : 47. 98 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 705
Read : 510

Get This Book


In this compelling book, highly acclaimed author and broadcaster Laurence Rees tells the definitive history of the most notorious Nazi institution of them all. We discover how Auschwitz evolved from a concentration camp for Polish political prisoners into the site of the largest mass murder in history - part death camp, part concentration camp, where around a million Jews were killed. Auschwitz examines the mentality and motivations of the key Nazi decision makers, and perpetrators of appalling crimes speak here for the first time about their actions. Fascinating and disturbing facts have been uncovered - from the operation of a brothel to the corruption that was rife throughout the camp. The book draws on intriguing new documentary material from recently opened Russian archives, which will challenge many previously accepted arguments. This is the story of murder, brutality, courage, escape and survival, and a powerful account of how human tragedy of such immense scale could have happened.

The Commandant Of Lubizec

Author : Patrick Hicks
ISBN : 9781586422219
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 57. 59 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 728
Read : 1157

Get This Book


After the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, they quickly began persecuting anyone who was Jewish. Millions were shoved into ghettos and forced to live under the swastika. Death camps were built and something called "Operation Reinhard" was set into motion. Its goal? To murder all the Jews of Poland. The Commandant of Lubizec is a harrowing account of a death camp that never actually existed but easily could have in the Nazi state. It is a sensitive, accurate retelling of a place that went about the business of genocide. Told as a historical account in a documentary style, it explores the atmosphere of a death camp. It describes what it was like to watch the trains roll in, and it probes into the mind of its commandant, Hans-Peter Guth. How could he murder thousands of people each day and then go home to laugh with his children? This is not only an unflinching portrayal of the machinery of the gas chambers, it is also the story of how prisoners burned the camp to the ground and fled into the woods. It is a story of rebellion and survival. It is a story of life amid death. With a strong eye towards the history of the Holocaust, The Commandant of Lubizec compels us to look at these extermination centers anew. It disquiets us with the knowledge that similar events actually took place in camps like Bełzec, Sobibór, and Treblinka. The history of Lubizec, although a work of fiction, is a chillingly blunt distillation of real life events. It asks that we look again at "Operation Reinhard". It brings voice to the silenced. It demands that we bear witness.

Holocaust City

Author : Tim Cole
ISBN : 9781135307004
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 50. 64 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 291
Read : 409

Get This Book


Drawing from the ideas of critical geography and based on extensive archival research, Cole brilliantly reconstructs the formation of the Jewish ghetto during the Holocaust, focusing primarily on the ghetto in Budapest, Hungary--one of the largest created during the war, but rarely examined. Cole maps the city illustrating how spaces--cafes, theaters, bars, bathhouses--became divided in two. Throughout the book, Cole discusses how the creation of this Jewish ghetto, just like the others being built across occupied Europe, tells us a great deal about the nature of Nazism, what life was like under Nazi-occupation, and the role the ghetto actually played in the Final Solution.

Top Download:

Best Books