homeward bound american families in the cold war era

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Homeward Bound

Author : Elaine Tyler May
ISBN : 9780786723461
Genre : History
File Size : 52. 64 MB
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A revised edition of the classic, myth-shattering exploration of American family life during the Cold War. When Homeward Bound first appeared in 1988, it forever changed how we understand Cold War America. Elaine Tyler May demonstrated that the Atomic Age and the Cold War shaped American life not just in national politics, but at every level of society, from the boardroom to the bedroom. Her notion of "domestic containment" is now the standard interpretation of the era, and Homeward Bound has become a classic. This new edition includes an updated introduction and a new epilogue examining the legacy of Cold War obsessions with personal and family security in the present day.

Homeward Bound

Author : Jarrod Homer
ISBN : 9781351350549
Genre :
File Size : 50. 94 MB
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Elaine Tyler May's 1988 Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era is a ground-breaking piece of historical and cultural analysis that uses its findings to build a strong argument for its author's view of the course of modern US history. The aim of May's study is to trace the links between Cold War politics and the domestic lives of everyday American families at the time. Historians have long noted the unique domestic trends of 1950s America, with its increased focus on the nuclear family, neatly divided traditional gender roles and aspirational, suburban consumer lifestyles. May's contribution was to analyse the interplay between the domestic scene and the political ideologies of American government, and then to build a carefully-constructed argument that draws attention to the ways in which these seemingly disparate forces are in fact related. May's key achievement was to use her analytical skills to understand the relationships between these different factors. She the traced ways in which domestic life and US foreign policy mirrored one another, showing that the structures and processes they aimed for, while different in scale, were essentially the same. She then carefully brought together different types of historical data, organizing her study to produce a carefully reasoned argument that the American suburban home was in certain direct ways the product of the 'containment' policies that ruled American foreign policy at the time.

American Theater In The Culture Of The Cold War

Author : Bruce A. Mcconachie
ISBN : 9781587294471
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 74. 91 MB
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In this groundbreaking study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containment—what happens when we categorize a play, a television show, or anything we view as having an inside, an outside, and a boundary between the two—as the dominant metaphor of cold war theatergoing. Drawing on the cognitive psychology and linguistics of George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, he provides unusual access to the ways in which spectators in the cold war years projected themselves into stage figures that gave them pleasure. McConachie reconstructs these cognitive processes by relying on scripts, set designs, reviews, memoirs, and other evidence. After establishing his theoretical framework, he focuses on three archtypal figures of containment significant in Cold War culture, Empty Boys, Family Circles, and Fragmented Heroes. McConachie uses a range of plays, musicals, and modern dances from the dominant culture of the Cold War to discuss these figures, including The Seven Year Itch, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof; The King and I,A Raisin in the Sun, Night Journey, and The Crucible. In an epilogue, he discusses the legacy of Cold War theater from 1962 to 1992. Original and provocative, American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War illuminates the mind of the spectator in the context of Cold War culture; it uses cognitive studies and media theory to move away from semiotics and psychoanalysis, forging a new way of interpreting theater history.

Be Very Afraid

Author : Robert Wuthnow
ISBN : 9780199730872
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 70. 10 MB
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Examines the human response to existential threats--once a matter for theology, but now looming before us in multiple forms. Nuclear weapons, pandemics, global warming: each threatens to destroy the planet, or at least to annihilate our species. Freud, Wuthnow notes, famously taught that the standard psychological response to an overwhelming danger is denial. In fact, Wuthnow argues, the opposite is true: we seek ways of positively meeting the threat, of doing something--anything--even if it's wasteful and time-consuming. It would be one thing if our responses were merely pointless, Wuthnow observes, but they can actually be harmful.--From publisher description.

Cold War Women

Author : Helen Laville
ISBN : 0719058562
Genre : History
File Size : 57. 81 MB
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For too long, American women have been hidden in the history of the Cold War. In Cold War Women Helen Laville recovers their significance by examining the activities and ambitions of American women's organisations in the long period of uneasy peace. After the Second World War, women around the globe claimed that to avoid more death and devastation in the Atomic Age, they must promote internationalism and strive together for a peaceful future. However, as the Cold War escalated, American women abandoned the internationalist outlook of their foreign sisters in favour of solidarity with their national brothers. Far from being advocates of internationalism, many of these women became active agents for Americanism. This fascinating study will be invaluable to those in the field of gender and women's history, cultural studies and American history.

Manhood And American Political Culture In The Cold War

Author : K.A. Cuordileone
ISBN : 9781136055102
Genre : History
File Size : 26. 78 MB
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Manhood and American Political Culture in the Cold War explores the meaning of anxiety as expressed through the political and cultural language of the early cold war era. Cuordileone shows how the preoccupation with the soft, malleable American character reflected not only anti-Communism but acute anxieties about manhood and sexuality. Reading major figures like Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Adlai Stevenson, Joseph McCarthy, Norman Mailer, JFK, and many lesser known public figures, Cuordileone reveals how the era’s cult of toughness shaped the political dynamics of the time and inspired a reinvention of the liberal as a cold warrior.

Women And Democracy In Cold War Japan

Author : Jan Bardsley
ISBN : 9781472533814
Genre : History
File Size : 83. 14 MB
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Women and Democracy in Cold War Japan offers a fresh perspective on gender politics by focusing on the Japanese housewife of the 1950s as a controversial representation of democracy, leisure, and domesticity. Examining the shifting personae of the housewife, especially in the appealing texts of women's magazines, reveals the diverse possibilities of postwar democracy as they were embedded in media directed toward Japanese women. Each chapter explores the contours of a single controversy, including debate over the royal wedding in 1959, the victory of Japan's first Miss Universe, and the unruly desires of postwar women. Jan Bardsley also takes a comparative look at the ways in which the Japanese housewife is measured against equally stereotyped notions of the modern housewife in the United States, asking how both function as narratives of Japan-U.S. relations and gender/class containment during the early Cold War.

Pursuing Privacy In Cold War America

Author : Deborah Nelson
ISBN : 9780231505888
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 57. 60 MB
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Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America explores the relationship between confessional poetry and constitutional privacy doctrine, both of which emerged at the end of the 1950s. While the public declarations of the Supreme Court and the private declamations of the lyric poet may seem unrelated, both express the upheavals in American notions of privacy that marked the Cold War era. Nelson situates the poetry and legal decisions as part of a far wider anxiety about privacy that erupted across the social, cultural, and political spectrum during this period. She explores the panic over the "death of privacy" aroused by broad changes in postwar culture: the growth of suburbia, the advent of television, the popularity of psychoanalysis, the arrival of computer databases, and the spectacles of confession associated with McCarthyism. Examining this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense moments of reflection in the 1960s, '70s, and '80s, Deborah Nelson produces a rhetorical analysis of a privacy concept integral to postwar America's self-definition and to bedrock contradictions in Cold War ideology. Nelson argues that the desire to stabilize privacy in a constitutional right and the movement toward confession in postwar American poetry were not simply manifestations of the anxiety about privacy. Supreme Court justices and confessional poets such as Anne Sexton, Robert Lowell, W. D. Snodgrass, and Sylvia Plath were redefining the nature of privacy itself. Close reading of the poetry alongside the Supreme Court's shifting definitions of privacy in landmark decisions reveals a broader and deeper cultural metaphor at work.

Tell Me True

Author : Patricia Hampl
ISBN : 0873518152
Genre : Literary Collections
File Size : 77. 42 MB
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Fourteen award-winning writers explore the fascinating intersection of history and memoir.

Merchant Of Illusion

Author : Nicholas Dagen Bloom
ISBN : 9780814209530
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 69. 32 MB
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