macroeconomics plus myeconlab with pearson etext 1 semester access access card package 6th edition

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Economics Plus Myeconlab With Pearson Etext 2 Semester Access Access Card Package

Author : Glenn P. Hubbard
ISBN : 0134417291
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 52. 62 MB
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NOTE: Before purchasing, check with your instructor to ensure you select the correct ISBN. Several versions of Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products exist for each title, and registrations are not transferable. To register for and use Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products, you may also need a Course ID, which your instructor will provide. Used books, rentals, and purchases made outside of Pearson If purchasing or renting from companies other than Pearson, the access codes for Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products may not be included, may be incorrect, or may be previously redeemed. Check with the seller before completing your purchase. "For two-semester courses in Principles of Economics." "This package includes MyEconLab" " (r) " ."" The Relevance of Economics Through Real-world Business Examples One of the challenges of teaching Principles of Economics is fostering interest in concepts that may not seem applicable to readers lives. "Economics" with MyEconLab makes economics relevant by demonstrating how real businesses use economics to make decisions every day. And with an ever changing U.S. and world economy, the Sixth Edition has been updated with the latest developments using new real-world business and policy examples. Regardless of their future career path opening an art studio, trading on Wall Street, or bartending at the local pub readers will benefit from understanding the economic forces behind their work. Personalize Learning with MyEconLab MyEconLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Within its structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and pursue a personalized study plan that helps them better absorb course material and understand difficult concepts. 0134417291 / 9780134417295 "Economics Plus MyEconLab with Pearson eText (2-semester Access) -- Access Card Package" Package consists of: 0134105842 / 9780134105840" Economics" 0134124375 / 9780134124377" MyEconLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card -- for Economics" "

Macroeconomics

Author : R. Glenn Hubbard
ISBN : 0134106229
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 31. 20 MB
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For one-semester courses in Principles of Macroeconomics. The Relevance of Economics Through Real-world Business Examples One of the challenges of teaching Principles of Macroeconomics is fostering interest in concepts that may not seem applicable to readers' lives. Macroeconomics with MyEconLab makes economics relevant by demonstrating how real businesses use economics to make decisions every day. And with an ever changing U.S. and world economy, the Sixth Edition has been updated with the latest developments using new real-world business and policy examples. Regardless of their future career path-opening an art studio, trading on Wall Street, or bartending at the local pub-readers will benefit from understanding the economic forces behind their work. Also Available with MyEconLab® This title is available with MyEconLab--an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Within its structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and pursue a personalized study plan that helps them better absorb course material and understand difficult concepts. NOTE: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyEconLab does not come packaged with this content. If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyEconLab search for: 0134435044 / 9780134435046 Macroeconomics Plus MyEconLab with Pearson eText (1-semester access) -- Access Card Package Package consists of: 0134106229 / 9780134106229 Macroeconomics 0134125959 / 9780134125954 MyEconLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card -- for Macroeconomics

Economics

Author : R. Glenn Hubbard
ISBN : 9780134123639
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 34. 88 MB
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For two-semester courses in Principles of Economics. The Relevance of Economics Through Real-world Business Examples One of the challenges of teaching Principles of Economics is fostering interest in concepts that may not seem applicable to students’ lives. Economics with MyEconLab makes economics relevant by demonstrating how real businesses use economics to make decisions every day. And with an ever changing U.S. and world economy, the Sixth Edition has been updated with the latest developments using new real-world business and policy examples. Regardless of their future career path–opening an art studio, trading on Wall Street, or bartending at the local pub–students will benefit from understanding the economic forces behind their work. Also Available with MyEconLab® This title is available with MyEconLab–an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Within its structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and pursue a personalized study plan that helps them better absorb course material and understand difficult concepts. NOTE: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyEconLab does not come packaged with this content. If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyEconLab search for: 0134417291 / 9780134417295 Economics Plus MyEconLab with Pearson eText (2-semester Access) -- Access Card Package Package consists of: 0134105842 / 9780134105840 Economics 0134124375 / 9780134124377 MyEconLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card -- for Economics

Microeconomics

Author : R. Glenn Hubbard
ISBN : 9780134125831
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 46. 18 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
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For one-semester courses in Principles of Microeconomics. The Relevance of Economics Through Real-world Business Examples One of the challenges of teaching Principles of Microeconomics is fostering interest in concepts that may not seem applicable to students’ lives. Microeconomics with MyEconLab makes economics relevant by demonstrating how real businesses use economics to make decisions every day. And with an ever changing U.S. and world economy, the Sixth Edition has been updated with the latest developments using new real-world business and policy examples. Regardless of their future career path–opening an art studio, trading on Wall Street, or bartending at the local pub–students will benefit from understanding the economic forces behind their work. Also Available with MyEconLab® This title is available with MyEconLab—an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Within its structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and pursue a personalized study plan that helps them better absorb course material and understand difficult concepts. NOTE: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyEconLab does not come packaged with this content. If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyEconLab search for: 0134435052 / 9780134435053 Microeconomics Plus MyEconLab with Pearson eText (1-semester access) -- Access Card Package Package consists of: 0134106245 / 9780134106243 Microeconomics 0134125886 / 9780134125886 MyEconLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card -- for Microeconomics

Macroeconomics 6th Edition Oliver Blanchard David R Johnson 2013

Author : Pearson Education Limited
ISBN :
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 69. 54 MB
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We had two main goals in writing this book: ■ To make close contact with current macroeconomic events. What makes macroeconomics exciting is the light it sheds on what is happening around the world, from the major economic crisis which has engulfed the world since 2008, to the budget deficits of the United States, to the problems of the Euro area, to high growth in China. These events—and many more—are described in the book, not in footnotes, but in the text or in detailed boxes. Each box shows how you can use what you have learned to get an understanding of these events. Our belief is that these boxes not only convey the “life” of macroeconomics, but also reinforce the lessons from the models, making them more concrete and easier to grasp. ■ To provide an integrated view of macroeconomics. The book is built on one underlying model, a model that draws the implications of equilibrium conditions in three sets of markets: the goods market, the financial markets, and the labor market. Depending on the issue at hand, the parts of the model relevant to the issue are developed in more detail while the other parts are simplified or lurk in the background. But the underlying model is always the same. This way, you will see macroeconomics as a coherent whole, not a collection of models. And you will be able to make sense not only of past macroeconomic events, but also of those that unfold in the future. New to this Edition ■ Chapter 1 starts with a history of the crisis, giving a sense of the landscape, and setting up the issues to be dealt with throughout the book. ■ A new Chapter 9, which comes after the short- and medium-run architecture have been put in place, focuses specifically on the crisis. It shows how one can use and extend the short-run and medium run analysis to understand the various aspects of the crisis, from the role of the financial system to the constraints on macroeconomic policy. ■ Material on depressions and slumps has been relocated from later chapters to Chapter 9, and the material on very high inflation has been reduced and included in Chapter 23. ■ A rewritten Chapter 23, on fiscal policy, focuses on the current debt problems of the United States. ■ Chapters 23, 24, and 25 draw the implications of the crisis for the conduct of fiscal and monetary policy in particular, and for macroeconomics in general. ■ Many new Focus boxes have been introduced and look at various aspects of the crisis, among them the following: “The Lehman Bankruptcy, Fears of Another Great Depression, and Shifts in the Consumption Function” in Chapter 3; “Bank Runs, Deposit Insurance, and Wholesale Funding” in Chapter 4; “The Liquidity Trap, Quantitative Easing, and the Role of Expectations” in Chapter 17; “The G20 and the 2009 Fiscal Stimulus” in Chapter 19; “How Countries Decreased Their Debt Ratios after World War II” in Chapter 23; and “LTV Ratios and Housing Price Increases from 2000 to 2007 in Chapter 24. ■ Figures and tables have been updated using the latest data available. Organization The book is organized around two central parts: A core, and a set of two major extensions. An introduction precedes the core. The two extensions are followed by a review of the role of policy. The book ends with an epilogue. A flowchart on the front endpaper makes it easy to see how the chapters are organized, and fit within the book’s overall structure. ■ Chapters 1 and 2 introduce the basic facts and issues of macroeconomics. Chapter 1 focuses on the crisis, and Expectations play a major role in most economic decisions, and, by implication, play a major role in the determination of output. Chapters 18 through 21 focus on the implications of openness of modern economies. Chapter 21 focuses on the implications of different exchange rate regimes, from flexible exchange rates, to fixed exchange rates, currency boards, and dollarization. ■ Chapters 22 through 24 return to macroeconomic policy. Although most of the first 41 chapters constantly discuss macroeconomic policy in one form or another, the purpose of Chapters 22 through 24 is to tie the threads together. Chapter 22 looks at the role and the limits of macroeconomic policy in general. Chapters 23 and 24 review monetary policy and fiscal policy. Some instructors may want to use parts of these chapters earlier. For example, it is easy to move forward the discussion of the government budget constraint in Chapter 23 or the discussion of inflation targeting in Chapter 24. ■ Chapter 25 serves as an epilogue; it puts macroeconomics in historical perspective by showing the evolution of macroeconomics in the last 90 years, discussing current directions of research, and the lessons of the crisis for macroeconomics. Changes from the Fifth to the Sixth Edition The structure of the sixth edition, namely the organization around a core and two extensions, is fundamentally the same as that of the fifth edition. This edition is, however, dominated in many ways by the crisis, and the many issues it raises. Thus, in addition to a first discussion of the crisis in Chapter 1, and numerous boxes and discussions throughout the book, we have added a new chapter, Chapter 9, specifically devoted to the crisis. At the same time, we have removed the two chapters on pathologies in the fifth edition. The reason is simple, and in some ways, ironic. While we thought that it was important for macroeconomic students to know about such events as the Great Depression, or the long slump in Japan, we did not expect the world to be confronted with many of the same issues any time soon. While far from being as bad as the Great Depression, the crisis raises many of the same issues as the Great Depression did. Thus, much of the material covered in the chapters on pathologies in the fifth edition has been moved to the core and to the two extensions. then takes a tour of the world, from the United States, to Europe, to China. Some instructors will prefer to cover Chapter 1 later, perhaps after Chapter 2, which introduces basic concepts, articulates the notions of short run, medium run, and long run, and gives the reader a quick tour of the book. While Chapter 2 gives the basics of national income accounting, we have put a detailed treatment of national income accounts to Appendix 1 at the end of the book. This decreases the burden on the beginning reader, and allows for a more thorough treatment in the appendix. ■ Chapters 3 through 13 constitute the core. Chapters 3 through 5 focus on the short run. These three chapters characterize equilibrium in the goods market and in the financial markets, and they derive the basic model used to study short–run movements in output, the IS– LM model. Chapters 6 through 8 focus on the medium run. Chapter 6 focuses on equilibrium in the labor market and introduces the notion of the natural rate of unemployment. Chapters 7 and 8 develop a model based on aggregate demand and aggregate supply and show how that model can be used to understand movements in activity and movements in inflation, both in the short and in the medium run. The current crisis is a sufficiently important and complex event that it deserves its own chapter. Building on and extending Chapters 6 to 8, Chapter 9 focuses on the origins of the crisis, the role of the financial system, and the constraints facing fiscal and monetary policy, such as the liquidity trap and the high level of public debt. Chapters 10 through 13 focus on the long run. Chapter 10 describes the facts, showing the evolution of output across countries and over long periods of time. Chapters 11 and 12 develop a model of growth and describe how capital accumulation and technological progress determine growth. Chapter 13 focuses on the effects of technological progress not only in the long run, but also in the short run and in the medium run. This topic is typically not covered in textbooks but is important. And the chapter shows how one can integrate the short run, the medium run, and the long run—a clear example of the payoff to an integrated approach to macroeconomics. ■ Chapters 14 through 21 cover the two major extensions. Chapters 14 through 17 focus on the role of expectations in the short run and in the medium run. 14 Preface discussions of facts in the text itself, we have written a large number of Focus boxes, which discuss particular macroeconomic events or facts, from the United States or from around the world. We have tried to re-create some of the student– teacher interactions that take place in the classroom by the use of margin notes, which run parallel to the text. The margin notes create a dialogue with the reader and, in so doing, smooth the more difficult passages and give a deeper understanding of the concepts and the results derived along the way. For students who want to explore macroeconomics further, we have introduced the following two features: ■ Short appendixes to some chapters, which expand on points made within the chapter. ■ A Further Readings section at the end of most chapters, indicating where to find more information, including a number of key Internet addresses. Each chapter ends with three ways of making sure that the material in the chapter has been digested: ■ A summary of the chapter’s main points. ■ A list of key terms. ■ A series of end-of-chapter exercises. “Quick Check” exercises are easy. “Dig Deeper” exercises are a bit harder, and “Explore Further” typically require either access to the Internet or the use of a spreadsheet program. A list of symbols on the back endpapers makes it easy to recall the meaning of the symbols used in the text. The Teaching and Learning Package The book comes with a number of supplements to help both students and instructors. For Instructors: ■ Instructor’s Manual. The Instructor’s manual discusses pedagogical choices, alternative ways of presenting the material, and ways of reinforcing students’ understanding. Chapters in the manual include six main sections: objectives, in the form of a motivating question; why the answer matters; key tools, concepts, and assumptions; summary; and pedagogy. Many chapters also include sections focusing on extensions and observations. The Instructor’s Manual also includes the answers to all end-of-chapter questions and exercises. We have also removed Chapter 9 of the fifth edition, which developed a framework to think about the relation between growth, unemployment, and inflation. This was in response to teachers who found the framework too difficult for students to follow. Again, some of the material in that chapter has been kept and integrated elsewhere, in particular in Chapter 8. Alternative Course Outlines Within the book’s broad organization, there is plenty of opportunity for alternative course organizations. We have made the chapters shorter than is standard in textbooks, and, in our experience, most chapters can be covered in an hour and a half. A few (Chapters 5 and 7 for example) might require two lectures to sink in. ■ Short courses. (15 lectures or less) A short course can be organized around the two introductory chapters and the core (Chapter 13 can be excluded at no cost in continuity). Informal presentations of one or two of the extensions, based, for example, on Chapter 17 for expectations (which can be taught as a stand alone), and on Chapter 18 for the open economy, can then follow, for a total of 14 lectures. A short course might leave out the study of growth (the long run). In this case, the course can be organized around the introductory chapters and Chapters 3 through 9 in the core; this gives a total of 9 lectures, leaving enough time to cover, for example, Chapter 17 on expectations, Chapters 18 through 20 on the open economy, for a total of 13 lectures. ■ Longer courses (20 to 25 lectures) A full semester course gives more than enough time to cover the core, plus one or both of the two extensions, and the review of policy. The extensions assume knowledge of the core, but are otherwise mostly self contained. Given the choice, the order in which they are best taught is probably the order in which they are presented in the book. Having studied the the role of expectations first helps students to understand the interest parity condition, and the nature of exchange rate crises. Features We have made sure never to present a theoretical result without relating it to the real world. In addition to Preface 15 16 Preface can even grade assignments that require students to draw a graph. ■ Real-Time Data—The real-time data problems are new. These problems load the latest available data from FRED, a comprehensive up-to-date data set maintained by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. The questions are graded with feedback in exactly the same way as those based on static data. After registering for MyEconLab, instructors have access to downloadable supplements such as an Instructor’s Manual, PowerPoint lecture notes, and a Test Item File. The Test Item File can also be used with MyEconLab, giving instructors ample material from which they can create assignments. MyEconLab is delivered in Pearson’s MyLab Mastering system, which offers advanced communication and customization features. Instructors can upload course documents and assignments and use advanced course management features. For more information about MyEconLab or to request an instructor access code, visit www.myeconlab.com. Acknowledgments and Thanks This book owes much to many. We thank Adam Ashcraft, Peter Berger, Peter Benczur, Efe Cakarel, Harry Gakidis, David Hwang, Kevin Nazemi, David Reichsfeld, Jianlong Tan, Stacy Tevlin, Gaurav Tewari, Corissa Thompson, John Simon, and Jeromin Zettelmeyer for their research assistance over the years. We thank the generations of students in 14.02 at MIT who have freely shared their reactions to the book over the years. We have benefited from comments from many colleagues and friends. Among them are John Abell, Daron Acemoglu, Tobias Adrian, Chuangxin An, Roland Benabou, Samuel Bentolila, and Juan Jimeno (who have adapted the book for a Spanish edition); Francois Blanchard, Roger Brinner, Ricardo Caballero, Wendy Carlin, Martina Copelman, Henry Chappell, Ludwig Chincarini, and Daniel Cohen (who has adapted the book for a French edition); Larry Christiano, Bud Collier, Andres Conesa, Peter Diamond, Martin Eichenbaum, Gary Fethke, David Findlay, Francesco Giavazzi, and Alessia Amighini (who have adapted the book for an Italian edition); Andrew Healy, Steinar Holden, and Gerhard Illing (who has adapted the book for a German edition); Yannis Ioannides, Angelo Melino (who has adapted the book for a Canadian edition); P. N. Junankar, Sam Keeley, Bernd Kuemmel, Paul ■ Test Item File. The test bank is completely revised with additional new multiple–choice questions for each chapter. ■ TestGen—The Test Item File is designed for use with the computerized TestGen package, which allows instructors to customize, save, and generate classroom tests. The test program permits instructors to edit, add, or delete questions from the test bank; edit existing graphics and create new graphics; analyze test results; and organize a database of tests and student results. This software allows for extensive flexibility and ease of use. It provides many options for organizing and displaying tests, along with search and sort features. The software and the Test Item File can be downloaded via www.pearsonglobaleditions. com/blanchard. ■ Digital Image Library—We have digitized the complete set of figures, graphs, and charts from the book. These files can be downloaded via www.pearsonglobaleditions. com/blanchard. ■ PowerPoint Lecture Slides—These electronic slides provide section titles, tables, equations, and graphs for each chapter and can be downloaded via www. pearsonglobaleditions.com/blanchard. MyEconLab® MyEconLab delivers rich online content and innovative learning tools in your classroom. Instructors who use MyEconLab gain access to powerful communication and assessment tools, and their students receive access to the additional learning resources described below. ■ Students and MyEconLab—This online homework and tutorial system puts students in control of their own learning through a suite of study and practice tools correlated with the online, interactive version of the textbook and other media tools. Within MyEconLab’s structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and then pursue a study plan that MyEconLab generates for them based on their performance on practice tests. ■ Instructors and MyEconLab—MyEconLab provides flexible tools that allow instructors to easily and effectively customize online course materials to suit their needs. Instructors can create and assign tests, quizzes, or homework assignments. MyEconLab saves time by automatically grading all questions and tracking results in an online gradebook. MyEconLab ■ Nicole Crain, Lafayette College ■ Rosemary Cunningham, Agnes Scott College ■ Evren Damar, Pacific Lutheran University ■ Dale DeBoer, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs ■ Adrian de Leon-Arias, Universidad de Guadalajara ■ Brad DeLong, UC Berkeley ■ Firat Demir, University of Oklahoma ■ Wouter Denhaan, UC San Diego ■ John Dodge, King College ■ F. Trenery Dolbear, Brandeis University ■ Patrick Dolenc, Keene State College ■ Brian Donhauser, University of Washington ■ Michael Donihue, Colby College ■ Vincent Dropsy, California State University ■ Justin Dubas, St. Norbert College ■ Amitava Dutt, University of Notre Dame ■ John Edgren, Eastern Michigan University ■ Eric Elder, Northwestern College ■ Sharon J. Erenburg, Eastern Michigan University ■ Antonina Espiritu, Hawaii Pacific University ■ J. Peter Federer, Clark University ■ Rendigs Fels, Vanderbilt University ■ John Flanders, Central Methodist University ■ Marc Fox, Brooklyn College ■ Yee-Tien (Ted) Fu, Stanford University ■ Yee-Tien Fu, National Cheng-Chi University, Taiwan ■ Scott Fullwiler, Wartburg College ■ Julie Gallaway, University of Missouri–Rolla ■ Bodhi Ganguli, Rutgers, The State University of NJ ■ Fabio Ghironi, Boston College ■ Alberto Gomez-Rivas, University of Houston–Downtown ■ Fidel Gonzalez, Sam Houston State University ■ Harvey Gram, Queen College, City University of New York Krugman, Antoine Magnier, Peter Montiel, Bill Nordhaus, Tom Michl, Dick Oppermann, Athanasios Orphanides, and Daniel Pirez Enri (who has adapted the book for a Latin American edition); Michael Plouffe, Zoran Popovic, Jim Poterba, and Jeff Sheen (who has adapted the book for an Australasian edition); Ronald Schettkat, and Watanabe Shinichi (who has adapted the book for a Japanese edition); Francesco Sisci, Brian Simboli, Changyong Rhee, Julio Rotemberg, Robert Solow, Andre Watteyne, and Michael Woodford. We have benefited from comments from many readers, reviewers, and class testers. Among them: ■ John Abell, Randolph, Macon Woman’s College ■ Carol Adams, Cabrillo College ■ Gilad Aharonovitz, School of Economic Sciences ■ Terence Alexander, Iowa State University ■ Roger Aliaga-Diaz, Drexel University ■ Robert Archibald, College of William & Mary ■ John Baffoe-Bonnie, La Salle University ■ Fatolla Bagheri, University of North Dakota ■ Stephen Baker, Capital University ■ Erol Balkan, Hamilton College ■ Jennifer Ball, Washburn University ■ Richard Ballman, Augustana College ■ King Banaian, St. Cloud State University ■ Charles Bean, London School of Economics and Political Science ■ Scott Benson, Idaho State University ■ Gerald Bialka, University of North Florida ■ Robert Blecker, American University ■ Scott Bloom, North Dakota State University ■ Pim Borren, University of Canterbury, New Zealand ■ LaTanya Brown-Robertson, Bowie State University ■ James Butkiewicz, University of Delaware ■ Colleen Callahan, American University ■ Bruce Carpenter, Mansfield University ■ Kyongwook Choi, Ohio University College ■ Michael Cook, William Jewell College Preface 17 18 Preface ■ Hsien-Feng Lee, National Taiwan University ■ Jim Lee, Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi ■ John Levendis, Loyola University New Orleans ■ Frank Lichtenberg, Columbia University ■ Mark Lieberman, Princeton University ■ Shu Lin, Florida Atlantic University ■ Maria Luengo-Prado, Northeastern University ■ Mathias Lutz, University of Sussex ■ Bernard Malamud, University of Nevada, Las Vegas ■ Ken McCormick, University of Northern Iowa ■ William McLean, Oklahoma State University ■ B. Starr McMullen, Oregon State University ■ Mikhail Melnik, Niagara University ■ O. Mikhail, University of Central Florida ■ Fabio Milani, University of California, Irvine ■ Rose Milbourne, University of New South Wales ■ Roger Morefield, University of Saint Thomas ■ Shahriar Mostashari, Campbell University ■ Eshragh Motahar, Union College ■ Nick Noble, Miami University ■ Ilan Noy, University of Hawaii ■ John Olson, College of St. Benedict ■ Brian O’Roark, Robert Morris University ■ Jack Osman, San Francisco State University ■ Emiliano Pagnotta, Northwestern University ■ Biru Paksha Paul, SUNY Cortland ■ Andrew Parkes, Mesa State College ■ Allen Parkman, University of Mexico ■ Jim Peach, New Mexico State University ■ Gavin Peebles, National University of Singapore ■ Michael Quinn, Bentley College ■ Charles Revier, Colorado State University ■ Jack Richards, Portland State University ■ Raymond Ring, University of South Dakota ■ Randy Grant, Linfield College ■ Alan Gummerson, Florida International University ■ Reza Hamzaee, Missouri Western State College ■ Michael Hannan, Edinboro University ■ Kenneth Harrison, Richard Stockton College ■ Mark Hayford, Loyola University ■ Thomas Havrilesky, Duke University ■ George Heitmann, Muhlenberg College ■ Ana Maria Herrera, Michigan State University ■ Peter Hess, Davidson College ■ Eric Hilt, Wellesley College ■ John Holland, Monmouth College ■ Mark Hopkins, Gettysburg College ■ Takeo Hoshi, University of California, San Diego ■ Ralph Husby, University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign ■ Yannis Ioannides, Tufts University ■ Aaron Jackson, Bentley College ■ Bonnie Johnson, California Lutheran University ■ Louis Johnston, College of St. Benedict ■ Barry Jones, SUNY Binghamton ■ Fred Joutz, George Washington University ■ Cem Karayalcin, Florida International University ■ Okan Kavuncu, University of California ■ Miles Kimball, University of Michigan ■ Paul King, Denison University ■ Michael Klein, Tufts University ■ Mark Klinedinst, University of Southern Mississippi ■ Shawn Knabb, Western Washington University ■ Todd Knoop, Cornell College ■ Paul Koch, Olivet Nazarene University ■ Ng Beoy Kui, Nanyang Technical University, Singapore ■ Leonard Lardaro, University of Rhode Island ■ James Leady, University of Notre Dame ■ Charles Leathers, University of Alabama ■ Monica Robayo, University of North Florida ■ Malcolm Robinson, Thomas Moore College ■ Brian Rosario, University of California, Davis ■ Kehar Sangha, Old Dominion University ■ Ahmad Saranjam, Bridgewater State College ■ Carol Scotese, Virginia Commonwealth University ■ John Seater, North Carolina State University ■ Peter Sephton, University of New Brunswick ■ Ruth Shen, San Francisco State University ■ Kwanho Shin, University of Kansas ■ Tara Sinclair, The George Washington University ■ Aaron Smallwood, University of Texas, Arlington ■ David Sollars, Auburn University ■ Liliana Stern, Auburn University ■ Edward Stuart, Northeastern Illinois University ■ Abdulhanid Sukaar, Cameron University ■ Peter Summers, Texas Tech University ■ Mark Thomas, University of Maryland Baltimore County ■ Brian Trinque, The University of Texas at Austin ■ Marie Truesdell, Marian College ■ David Tufte, Southern Utah University ■ Abdul Turay, Radford University ■ Frederick Tyler, Fordham University ■ Pinar Uysal, Boston College ■ Evert Van Der Heide, Calvin College ■ Kristin Van Gaasbeck, California State University, Sacramento ■ Lee Van Scyoc, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh ■ Paul Wachtel, New York University Stern Business School ■ Susheng Wang, Hong Kong University ■ Donald Westerfield, Webster University ■ Christopher Westley, Jacksonville State University ■ David Wharton, Washington College ■ Jonathan Willner, Oklahoma City University ■ Mark Wohar, University of Nebraska, Omaha ■ Steven Wood, University of California, Berkeley ■ Michael Woodford, Princeton University ■ Ip Wing Yu, University of Hong Kong ■ Chi-Wa Yuen, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology ■ Christian Zimmermann, University of Connecticut ■ Liping Zheng, Drake University They have helped us beyond the call of duty, and each has made a difference to the book. We have many people to thank at Pearson/Prentice Hall: David Alexander, executive editor for Economics; Lindsey Sloan, editorial project manager; Emily Brodeur, editorial assistant; Nancy Freihofer, production editor; and Lori DeShazo, the marketing manager for Economics, and Lauren Foster at PreMediaGlobal. Thanks from Olivier I want to single out Steve Rigolosi, the editor for the first edition; Michael Elia, the editor to the second and third editions; Amy Ray, the editor of the fourth edition; and Chris Rogers, the editor of the fifth edition. Steve forced me to clarify. Michael forced me to simplify. Amy forced me to simplify further. Together, they have made all the difference to the process and to the book. I thank all of them deeply. At MIT, I continue to thank John Arditi for his absolute reliability. I have also benefited from often-stimulating suggestions from my daughters, Serena, Giulia and Marie: I did not, however, follow all of them. At home, I continue to thank Noelle for preserving my sanity. Olivier Blanchard Cambridge, MIT June 2012 Thanks from David I have to thank Olivier for encouraging me to write the Canadian editions of this book over the past decade. I enjoyed that work and I enjoyed teaching out of the Canadian edition. I appreciated the opportunity to participate in the sixth American edition. I would like to thank the many students in intermediate macroeconomics at Wilfrid Laurier University whom I have taught over the years. I was blessed with four excellent instructors in macroeconomics at the graduate level: Preface 19 David Laidler, Michael Parkin, Benjamin Friedman and Olivier Blanchard. These professors taught macroeconomics in a way that made it engaging and exciting. Alastair Robertson, who was a superb colleague for many years in teaching intermediate macroeconomics at WLU, taught me a lot about teaching. Finally I would like to thank my wife Susan. I benefit so much from her love and support. David Johnson, Wilfred Laurier University Waterloo, Ontario, June 2012 Pearson gratefully acknowledges and thanks the following people for their work on the Global Edition: Contributors André Watteyne, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Kulak Merike Kukk, Tallinn University of Technology Etienne Farvaque, Université du Havre Reviewers Zou Lin, Lingnan University

Golosa

Author : Richard M. Robin
ISBN : 0131986287
Genre : Foreign Language Study
File Size : 24. 94 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
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For courses in First-year Russian - Introductory Russian. Golosa is a two-volume, introductory Russian-language program that strikes a balance between communication and structure. It is designed to help students reach the Intermediate range in speaking and listening plus reading and writing. In addition to the text, each volume of Golosa has an accompanying Student Activities Manual (workbook, lab manual, video manual) with audio-drills and written exercises, and an audio program that includes listening comprehension exercises, dialogs, conversations, and rapid-pace oral drills. The robust Companion Website offers additional lexical and grammatical exercises, links to authentic Russian websites, and the entire Golosa audio program. Each unit in the program revolves around a theme (university, family, etc.), and follows the same basic format: introduction of basic vocabulary for the chapter theme, listening to introductory conversations, short dialogs with activities and role-play practice, practice in listening and reading with emphasis on strategies, grammar study and practice in both oral and written form, and written workbook exercises that go from mechanical skill-building to creative skill-using.

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