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Picasso

Author : Pablo Picasso
ISBN : UOM:39015063305463
Genre : Art
File Size : 76. 89 MB
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Pablo Picasso

Author : Tim McNeese
ISBN : 9781438106878
Genre : Artists
File Size : 31. 56 MB
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These riveting personalities each achieved excellence, but even greater than their individual accomplishments is the positive Hispanic image they collectively represent to the world. Photographs, illustrations, and lively text tell the stories ot these fascinating historical figures. This world-famous Spanish painter, sculptor, and graphic artist was the foremost figure in 20th-century art.

Picasso

Author : Victoria Charles
ISBN : 1780423187
Genre : Art
File Size : 26. 56 MB
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Picasso was born a Spaniard and, so they say, began to draw before he could speak. As an infant he was instinctively attracted to artist’s tools. In early childhood he could spend hours in happy concentration drawing spirals with a sense and meaning known only to himself. At other times, shunning children’s games, he traced his first pictures in the sand. This early self-expression held out promise of a rare gift. Málaga must be mentioned, for it was there, on 25 October 1881, that Pablo Ruiz Picasso was born and it was there that he spent the first ten years of his life. Picasso’s father was a painter and professor at the School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Picasso learnt from him the basics of formal academic art training. Then he studied at the Academy of Arts in Madrid but never finished his degree. Picasso, who was not yet eighteen, had reached the point of his greatest rebelliousness; he repudiated academia’s anemic aesthetics along with realism’s pedestrian prose and, quite naturally, joined those who called themselves modernists, the non-conformist artists and writers, those whom Sabartés called “the élite of Catalan thought” and who were grouped around the artists’ café Els Quatre Gats. During 1899 and 1900 the only subjects Picasso deemed worthy of painting were those which reflected the “final truth”; the transience of human life and the inevitability of death. His early works, ranged under the name of “Blue Period” (1901-1904), consist in blue-tinted paintings influenced by a trip through Spain and the death of his friend, Casagemas. Even though Picasso himself repeatedly insisted on the inner, subjective nature of the Blue Period, its genesis and, especially, the monochromatic blue were for many years explained as merely the results of various aesthetic influences. Between 1905 and 1907, Picasso entered a new phase, called “Rose Period” characterised by a more cheerful style with orange and pink colours. In Gosol, in the summer of 1906 the nude female form assumed an extraordinary importance for Picasso; he equated a depersonalised, aboriginal, simple nakedness with the concept of “woman”. The importance that female nudes were to assume as subjects for Picasso in the next few months (in the winter and spring of 1907) came when he developed the composition of the large painting, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Just as African art is usually considered the factor leading to the development of Picasso’s classic aesthetics in 1907, the lessons of Cézanne are perceived as the cornerstone of this new progression. This relates, first of all, to a spatial conception of the canvas as a composed entity, subjected to a certain constructive system. Georges Braque, with whom Picasso became friends in the autumn of 1908 and together with whom he led Cubism during the six years of its apogee, was amazed by the similarity of Picasso’s pictorial experiments to his own. He explained that: “Cubism’s main direction was the materialisation of space.” After his Cubist period, in the 1920s, Picasso returned to a more figurative style and got closer to the surrealist movement. He represented distorted and monstrous bodies but in a very personal style. After the bombing of Guernica during 1937, Picasso made one of his most famous works which starkly symbolises the horrors of that war and, indeed, all wars. In the 1960s, his art changed again and Picasso began looking at the art of great masters and based his paintings on ones by Velázquez, Poussin, Goya, Manet, Courbet and Delacroix. Picasso’s final works were a mixture of style, becoming more colourful, expressive and optimistic. Picasso died in 1973, in his villa in Mougins. The Russian Symbolist Georgy Chulkov wrote: “Picasso’s death is tragic. Yet how blind and naïve are those who believe in imitating Picasso and learning from him. Learning what? For these forms have no corresponding emotions outside of Hell. But to be in Hell means to anticipate death. The Cubists are hardly privy to such unlimited knowledge”.

Picasso

Author : Roland Penrose
ISBN : 0520042077
Genre : Art
File Size : 60. 30 MB
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"Intimate, yet objective; comprehensive, yet enthralling; this biography of the greatest artists of our century will rank with Vasari in the annals of European painting."--Sir Herbert Read "Authoritative and a good read." --Daily Mail

Pablo Picasso

Author : Mary Ann Caws
ISBN : 1861892470
Genre : Art
File Size : 77. 84 MB
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Uses a thematic and chronological approach to a discussion of Picasso's life and art.

Picasso

Author : Pablo Picasso
ISBN : UOM:39015051298894
Genre : Art
File Size : 57. 52 MB
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Unlike the human body and still life, landscapes were not one of Picasso's primary genres, but emerged over time as a game he played with combinations and symbols. This superb book, catalogue to a 1999 exhibition of the same name at the Picasso Museu, Barcelona, maps the evolution of Picasso's landscapes. Essays include Making a Landscape out of the Body by Valeriano Bozal and works include The Kiss, The Sleepers, Country Concert, The Pigeons (series), The Rescue, The Kitchen, The Bathers, and Flower Seller.

Picasso

Author : Ingo F. Walther
ISBN : 3822859702
Genre : Art
File Size : 45. 33 MB
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The entertaining companion novel to the best-selling The Sweet Second Life of Darrell Kincaid. Michelle Lawrence's perfect life has been just as she's designed it. But then her husband, Chad, ruins everything by taking a job in San Francisco, about as far from their comfortable family home as it's possible to get without actually emigrating. Up until now, Chad's primary focus has been keeping her happy, and Michelle can see no good reason why this should change. But change it has, and Michelle now has to deal with Chad's increasing detachment, while building a new life with her two small children in a place filled with cat-eating coyotes. On top of that, Michelle's oldest friend is turning against marriage while her newest is a little too obsessed with clean taps. And down the redwood-lined street, there's Aishe Herne, a woman who could pick a fight with a silent order of nuns. Aishe has designed her own kind of perfect life, in which there's room for her, her teenage son and no one else. But when cousin Patrick lands in town like a Cockney nemesis, both Aishe and Michelle must begin determined campaigns to regain their grip on the steering wheel of their lives. The Catherine Robertson Trilogy Book 1: The Sweet Second Life of Darrell Kincaid Book 2: The Not So Perfect Life of Mo Lawrence Book 3: The Misplaced Affections of Charlotte Forbes

A Picasso Portfolio

Author : Deborah Wye
ISBN : 0870707809
Genre : Art
File Size : 75. 36 MB
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Surveys the lithographs, etchings, and linoleum cuts created by the late artist through color reproductions and essays that examine specific pieces of art.

Picasso

Author : Christopher Green
ISBN : 030010412X
Genre : Art
File Size : 82. 51 MB
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The starting point of this exciting new exploration of Picasso is not his life but his work, which is revealed as a series of interventions in the troubled history of early twentieth-century Europe. Christopher Green shows how these interventions are remarkable for the force with which they confront issues that remain vital and important for us today: race, cultural difference, modernity, sexuality and the discontents of civilization. The framework for Green’s exploration is simple, yet enormously rich in its implications: the compulsion found in Picasso’s work simultaneously to build architectures and to release himself from them. Architecture is used by Green to refer not merely to pictorial or sculptural structure, but to the architecture of knowledge and society: the structures of tradition, of racial, social and cultural distinction, of logic and of technology. He not only develops new ways of seeing the oscillation between order and disorder in Picasso’s work, but moves outwards from it to reveal how it confronted and challenged the architectures of orthodoxy.

Pablo Picasso

Author : Victoria Charles
ISBN : 9781780422992
Genre : Art
File Size : 27. 34 MB
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Picasso was born a Spaniard and, so they say, began to draw before he could speak. As an infant he was instinctively attracted to artist’s tools. In early childhood he could spend hours in happy concentration drawing spirals with a sense and meaning known only to himself. At other times, shunning children’s games, he traced his first pictures in the sand. This early self-expression held out promise of a rare gift. Málaga must be mentioned, for it was there, on 25 October 1881, that Pablo Ruiz Picasso was born and it was there that he spent the first ten years of his life. Picasso’s father was a painter and professor at the School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Picasso learnt from him the basics of formal academic art training. Then he studied at the Academy of Arts in Madrid but never finished his degree. Picasso, who was not yet eighteen, had reached the point of his greatest rebelliousness; he repudiated academia’s anemic aesthetics along with realism’s pedestrian prose and, quite naturally, joined those who called themselves modernists, the non-conformist artists and writers, those whom Sabartés called “the élite of Catalan thought” and who were grouped around the artists’ café Els Quatre Gats. During 1899 and 1900 the only subjects Picasso deemed worthy of painting were those which reflected the “final truth”; the transience of human life and the inevitability of death. His early works, ranged under the name of “Blue Period” (1901-1904), consist in blue-tinted paintings influenced by a trip through Spain and the death of his friend, Casagemas. Even though Picasso himself repeatedly insisted on the inner, subjective nature of the Blue Period, its genesis and, especially, the monochromatic blue were for many years explained as merely the results of various aesthetic influences. Between 1905 and 1907, Picasso entered a new phase, called “Rose Period” characterised by a more cheerful style with orange and pink colours. In Gosol, in the summer of 1906 the nude female form assumed an extraordinary importance for Picasso; he equated a depersonalised, aboriginal, simple nakedness with the concept of “woman”. The importance that female nudes were to assume as subjects for Picasso in the next few months (in the winter and spring of 1907) came when he developed the composition of the large painting, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Just as African art is usually considered the factor leading to the development of Picasso’s classic aesthetics in 1907, the lessons of Cézanne are perceived as the cornerstone of this new progression. This relates, first of all, to a spatial conception of the canvas as a composed entity, subjected to a certain constructive system. Georges Braque, with whom Picasso became friends in the autumn of 1908 and together with whom he led Cubism during the six years of its apogee, was amazed by the similarity of Picasso’s pictorial experiments to his own. He explained that: “Cubism’s main direction was the materialisation of space.” After his Cubist period, in the 1920s, Picasso returned to a more figurative style and got closer to the surrealist movement. He represented distorted and monstrous bodies but in a very personal style. After the bombing of Guernica during 1937, Picasso made one of his most famous works which starkly symbolises the horrors of that war and, indeed, all wars. In the 1960s, his art changed again and Picasso began looking at the art of great masters and based his paintings on ones by Velázquez, Poussin, Goya, Manet, Courbet and Delacroix. Picasso’s final works were a mixture of style, becoming more colourful, expressive and optimistic. Picasso died in 1973, in his villa in Mougins. The Russian Symbolist Georgy Chulkov wrote: “Picasso’s death is tragic. Yet how blind and naïve are those who believe in imitating Picasso and learning from him. Learning what? For these forms have no corresponding emotions outside of Hell. But to be in Hell means to anticipate death. The Cubists are hardly privy to such unlimited knowledge”.

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