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The Atlantic Monthly

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ISBN : OSU:32435018807321
Genre : American literature
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The Atlantic Monthly

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ISBN : STANFORD:36105007118966
Genre : Language Arts & Disciplines
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The Atlantic Monthly

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ISBN : UIUC:30112109919610
Genre : American literature
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Atlantic Monthly

Author : Atlantic Monthly
ISBN : 0371128889
Genre : History
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This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended. Since the original versions are generally quite old, there may occasionally be certain imperfections within these reproductions. We're happy to make these classics available again for future generations to enjoy!

The Atlantic Monthly Volume 20 No 120 October 1867

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ISBN : OCLC:914180593
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Youth And The New World

Author : Ralph Philip Boas
ISBN : NYPL:33433069238420
Genre : American essays
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The Atlantic Monthly

Author : Various
ISBN : 1414277555
Genre : Fiction
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Atlantic Monthly

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ISBN : BSB:BSB10617609
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The Atlantic Monthly Library Of Travel In The Levant By C D Warner

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ISBN : STANFORD:36105026537881
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The Atlantic Monthly Library Of Travel Our Old Home By N Hawthorne

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ISBN : STANFORD:36105026537717
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The Atlantic Monthly V208 No 4 October 1961

Author : Atlantic Monthly Company
ISBN : 1258517663
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Includes The Articles The Arabs Of Palestine By Martha Gellhorn; Poisoned Politics By Elliot Richardson; Sinclair Lewis And The Nobel Prize By Mark Schorer And Many Others.

Morality Of Thackeray And George Eliot Cut From Atlantic Monthly Feb 1883 78

Author : M. L. Henry
ISBN : HARVARD:32044086839651
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The Atlantic Monthly November 1857 Vol 1 No 1

Author : The Atlantic
ISBN : 9798688844405
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For over 160 years, the Atlantic monthly magazine has been a staple of American culture. This is the first ever Atlantic monthly magazine ever published. Use it for reference, a conversation starter, or simply to enjoy the literature from long ago. There is something inside for everyone! This is the first in a series of republications of the Atlantic monthly magazine's oldest issues. We think making available in print and digital form these texts will help ensure their content exists in perpetuity and does not get left behind.

The Atlantic Monthly 1893 Vol 72

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ISBN : 0483486817
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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, 1893, Vol. 72: A Magazine of Literature, Science, And, and Politics Nevertheless he was relieved to be free of-their presence. He felt that it was well that their legitimate business one as a stock broker, the other a real estate agent held them to their desks in the city of Bretonville. The mani fest purpose of their creation, he thought, was fully served in their furnishing forth their quota of the sinews of war. He was much younger than either, but he had learned something beyond their knowledge in this internecine strife, and when it became necessary to provide for them occupation, to prevent further in terference in the venture which had come to be of most hopeful interest to both, he wrote to them touching the finding of a suitable man to keep the hotel when built, certain that in this quest for a Boniface he had set them by the ears, and relying on their different temperaments to keep them wrangling together and to leave him in peace. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 11

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ISBN : 1331085853
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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 11: A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics Long ago, when you were a little boy or a little girl, - perhaps not so very long ago, either, - were you never interrupted in your play by being called in to have your face washed, your hair combed, and your soiled apron exchanged for a clean one, preparatory to an introduction to Mrs. Smith, or Dr. Jones, or Aunt Judkins, your mother's early friend? And after being ushered in to that august presence, and made to face a battery of questions which were either above or below your capacity, and which you consequently despised as trash or resented as insult, did you not, as you were gleefully vanishing, hear a soft sigh breathed out upon the air, - "Dear child, he is seeing his happiest days"? In the concrete, it was Mrs. Smith or Dr. Jones speaking of you. But going back to general principles, it was Common placedom expressing its opinion of childhood. There never was a greater piece of absurdity in the world. I thought so when I was a child, and now I know it; and I desire here to brand it as at once a platitude and a falsehood. How ever the idea gained currency that childhood is the happiest period of life, I cannot conceive. How ever, once started, it kept afloat is equally incomprehensible. I should have supposed that the expedience of every sane person would have given the lie to it. I should have supposed that every soul, as it burst into flower, would have hurled off the vile imputation. I can only account for it by recurring to Lady Mary Wortley Montague's statistics, and concluding that the fools are three out of four in every person's acquaintance. I for one lift up my voice emphatically against the assertion, and do affirm that I think childhood is the most mean and miserable portion of human life, and I am thankful to be well out of it. I look upon it as no better than a mitigated form of slavery. There is not a child in the land that can call his soul, or his body, or his jacket his own. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Atlantic Monthly

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ISBN : OCLC:44309458
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Presents the online edition of "The Atlantic Monthly," a magazine devoted to politics, society, the arts, and culture. Posts the contents of the current print edition, including articles in the departments of books, arts and leisure, reports, humor, fiction, and poetry. Includes past magazine issues, editor biographies, a site users guide, a FAQ section, and subscription information for the "TransAtlantic" free e-mail newsletter. Provides access to The Exchange online bookstore of "Atlantic" authors, the Agora page for feedback and letters-to-the-editor, and the home pages of site sponsor companies.

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 35

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ISBN : 1331170729
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 35: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics Mallet had made his arrangements to sail for Europe on the first of September, and having in the interval a fortnight to spare, he determined to spend it with his cousin Cecilia, the widow of a nephew of his father. He was urged by the reflection that an affectionate farewell might help to exonerate him from the charge of neglect frequently preferred by this lady. It was not that the young man disliked her; on the contrary, he regarded her with a tender admiration, and he had not forgotten how, when his cousin had brought her home on their marriage, he had seemed to feel the upward sweep of the empty bough from which the golden fruit had been plucked, and had then and there accepted the prospect of bachelorhood. The truth was, that, as it will be part of the entertainment of this narrative to exhibit, Rowland Mallet had an uncomfortably sensitive conscience, and that, in spite of the seeming paradox, his visits to Cecilia were rare because she and her misfortunes were often uppermost in it. Her misfortunes were three in number: first, she had lost her husband; second, she had lost her money (or the greater part of it); and third, she lived at Northampton, Massachusetts. Mallet's compassion was really wasted, because Cecilia was a very clever woman, and a most skillful counter-plotter to adversity. She had made herself a charming home, her economies were not obtrusive, and there was always a cheerful flutter in the folds of her crape. It was the consciousness of all this that puzzled Mallet whenever he felt tempted to put in his oar. He had money and he had time, but he never could decide just how to place these gifts gracefully at Cecilia's service. He no longer felt like marrying her: in these eight years that fancy had died a natural death. And yet her extreme cleverness seemed somehow to make charity difficult and patronage impossible. He would rather chop off his hand than offer her a check, a piece of useful furniture, or a black silk dress; and yet there was some sadness in seeing such a bright, proud woman living in such a small, dull way. Cecilia had, moreover, a turn for sarcasm, and her smile, which was her pretty feature, was never so pretty as when her sprightly phrase had a lurking scratch in it. Rowland remembered that, for him, she was all smiles, and suspected, awkwardly, that he ministered not a little to her sense of the irony of things. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 21

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ISBN : 1331126630
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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 21: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics The Wife. Have ceased, and we can draw our breath once more Freely and full. So, as yon harvesters Make glad their nooning underneath the elms With tale and riddle and old snatch of song, I lay aside grave themes, and idly play With fancies borrowed from remembered hills That beckon to me from the cold blue North. And yet not idly all. A farmer's son, Proud of field lore and harvest-craft, and feeling All their fine possibilities, while yet Knowing too well the hard necessities Of labor and privation, and the bare And colorless realities of life Without an atmosphere, I fain would see The rugged outlines touched and glorified With mellowing haze and golden-tinted mist. Our yeoman should be equal to his home Set in these fair green valleys, purple-walled, - A man to match his mountains, not a drudge Dull as the clod he turns. I fain would teach In this light way the blind eyes to discern, And the cold hearts to feel, in common things, Beatitudes of beauty; and, meanwhile, Pay somewhat of the mighty debt I owe To Nature for her ministry of love And life-long benediction. With the rocks And woods and mountain valleys which have been Solace in suffering, and exceeding joy In life's best moments, I would leave some sign, When I am but a name and memory, That I have loved them. Haply, in the years That wait to take the places of our own, Whispered upon some breezy balcony Fronting the hills, or where the lake in the moon Sleeps dreaming of the mountains, fair as Ruth, In the old Hebrew pastoral, at the feet Of Boaz, even this little lay of mine May lift some burden from a heavy heart, Or make a light one lighter for its sake. We held our sideling way above The rivers whitening shallows, By homesteads old, with wide-flung barns Swept through and through by swallows, - By maple orchards, belts of pine And larches climbing darkly The mountain slopes, and, over all, The great peaks rising starkly. You should have seen that long hill-range With gaps of brightness rivers, - About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 38

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ISBN : 0483554545
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 38: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics The information is addressed to Ma. Dame, whom Ahman, utterly regardless of sex, invariably addresses by the namethe Nile. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 14

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ISBN : 1331126681
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 14: A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics I will tell you the story of my life, since you ask it; for, though the meaning of the life of any woman of my character would be the same, I believe, the facts of mine, being sharp and compressed, may make it, perhaps, more apparent. It will be enough for me to give you the history of one day, - that of our first coming to Newport; for it seems to me as if it held and spoke out plainly whatever gist and significance there was in all the years for me. I know many people hold the theory, that once in every life God puts the stuff of which He has made the man or woman to the test, gives the soul a chance of a conscious fight with that other Power to win or lose itself, once for all. I do not know: it seems but just that one should be so left, untrammelled, to choose between heaven and hell: but who can shake off trammels, - make themselves naked of their birth and education? I know on that day when the face of my fate changed, I myself was conscious of no inward master-struggle: the great Life above and Life below pressed no closer on me, seemed to wait on no word of mine. It was a busy, vulgar day enough: each passing moment occupied me thoroughly. I did not look through them for either God or Death; and as for the deed I did, I had been drifting to that all my life: it began when I was a pampered, thin-blooded baby, learning the alphabet from blocks on my mother's lap; then years followed, succulent to satiety for my hungry brain and stimulated tastes; a taint of hereditary selfishness played its part, and so the end came. Yet I know that on that day I entered the gate through which there is no returning: for, believe me, there are such, ways and gates in life; every day, I see more clearly how far and how immovably the paths into those other worlds abut into this, and I know that I, for one, have gone in, and the door is closed behind me. There is no going back for me into that long-ago time. Only He who led me here knows how humbly and through what pain I dared to believe this, and dare to believe that He did lead me, - that it was by no giddy, blear - sighted free-will of my own that I arrived where I stand to-day. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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