walls and mirrors mexican americans mexican immigrants and the politics of ethnicity

Download Book Walls And Mirrors Mexican Americans Mexican Immigrants And The Politics Of Ethnicity in PDF format. You can Read Online Walls And Mirrors Mexican Americans Mexican Immigrants And The Politics Of Ethnicity here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Walls And Mirrors

Author : David G. Gutiérrez
ISBN : 9780520202191
Genre : History
File Size : 46. 77 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 232
Read : 251

Get This Book


Covering more than one hundred years of American history, Walls and Mirrors examines the ways that continuous immigration from Mexico transformed—and continues to shape—the political, social, and cultural life of the American Southwest. Taking a fresh approach to one of the most divisive political issues of our time, David Gutiérrez explores the ways that nearly a century of steady immigration from Mexico has shaped ethnic politics in California and Texas, the two largest U.S. border states. Drawing on an extensive body of primary and secondary sources, Gutiérrez focuses on the complex ways that their pattern of immigration influenced Mexican Americans' sense of social and cultural identity—and, as a consequence, their politics. He challenges the most cherished American myths about U.S. immigration policy, pointing out that, contrary to rhetoric about "alien invasions," U.S. government and regional business interests have actively recruited Mexican and other foreign workers for over a century, thus helping to establish and perpetuate the flow of immigrants into the United States. In addition, Gutiérrez offers a new interpretation of the debate over assimilation and multiculturalism in American society. Rejecting the notion of the melting pot, he explores the ways that ethnic Mexicans have resisted assimilation and fought to create a cultural space for themselves in distinctive ethnic communities throughout the southwestern United States.

The Practice Of U S Women S History

Author : S. J. Kleinberg
ISBN : 9780813541815
Genre : History
File Size : 77. 79 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 619
Read : 390

Get This Book


In the last several decades, U.S. women's history has come of age. Not only have historians challenged the national narrative on the basis of their rich explorations of the personal, the social, the economic, and the political, but they have also entered into dialogues with each other over the meaning of women's history itself. In this collection of seventeen original essays on women's lives from the colonial period to the present, contributors take the competing forces of race, gender, class, sexuality, religion, and region into account. Among many other examples, they examine how conceptions of gender shaped government officials' attitudes towards East Asian immigrants; how race and gender inequality pervaded the welfare state; and how color and class shaped Mexican American women's mobilization for civil and labor rights.

Hector P Garcia

Author :
ISBN : 0809388057
Genre :
File Size : 49. 31 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 884
Read : 452

Get This Book



Lulac Mexican Americans And National Policy

Author : Craig A. Kaplowitz
ISBN : 1585443883
Genre : History
File Size : 68. 60 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 881
Read : 388

Get This Book


Through the dedicated intervention of LULAC and other Mexican American activist groups, the understanding of civil rights in America was vastly expanded in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Mexican Americans gained federal remedies for discrimination based not simply on racial but also on cultural and linguistic disadvantages. Generally considered one of the more conservative ethnic political organizations, LULAC had traditionally espoused nonconfrontational tactics and had insisted on the identification of Mexican Americans as “white.” But by 1966, the changing civil rights environment, new federal policies that protected minority groups, and rising militancy among Mexican American youth led LULAC to seek federal protections for Mexican Americans as a distinct minority. In that year, LULAC joined other Mexican American groups in staging a walkout during meetings with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Albuquerque. In this book, Craig A. Kaplowitz draws on primary sources, at both national and local levels, to understand the federal policy arena in which the identity issues and power politics of LULAC were played out. At the national level, he focuses on presidential policies and politics, since civil rights has been preeminently a presidential issue. He also examines the internal tensions between LULAC members’ ethnic allegiances and their identity as American citizens, which led to LULAC’s attempt to be identified as white while, paradoxically, claiming policy benefits from the fact that Mexican Americans were treated as if they were non-white. This compelling study offers an important bridge between the history of social movements and the history of policy development. It also provides new insight into an important group on America’s multicultural stage.

Becoming Mexican American

Author : George J. Sanchez
ISBN : 0195096487
Genre : History
File Size : 57. 5 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 207
Read : 1164

Get This Book


Twentieth century Los Angeles has been the focus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between distinct cultures in U.S. history. In this pioneering study, Sanchez explores how Mexican immigrants "Americanized" themselves in order to fit in, thereby losing part of their own culture.

Aztl N Arizona

Author : Darius V. Echeverr’a
ISBN : 9780816529841
Genre : History
File Size : 83. 49 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 291
Read : 1170

Get This Book


Aztlán Arizona is the first thorough examination of Arizona's Chicano student movement, providing an exhaustive history of the emergence of the state's Chicano Movement politics and its related school reform efforts. Darius V. Echeverría reveals how Mexican American communities fostered a togetherness that ultimately modified larger Arizona society by revamping the educational history of the region.

Militarizing The Border

Author : Miguel Antonio Levario
ISBN : 1603447792
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 40. 50 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 258
Read : 687

Get This Book


As historian Miguel Antonio Levario explains in this timely book, current tensions and controversy over immigration and law enforcement issues centered on the US-Mexico border are only the latest evidence of a long-standing atmosphere of uncertainty and mistrust plaguing this region. Militarizing the Border: When Mexicans Became the Enemy, focusing on El Paso and its environs, examines the history of the relationship among law enforcement, military, civil, and political institutions, and local communities. In the years between 1895 and 1940, West Texas experienced intense militarization efforts by local, state, and federal authorities responding to both local and international circumstances. El Paso’s “Mexicanization” in the early decades of the twentieth century contributed to strong racial tensions between the region’s Anglo population and newly arrived Mexicans. Anglos and Mexicans alike turned to violence in order to deal with a racial situation rapidly spinning out of control. Highlighting a binational focus that sheds light on other US-Mexico border zones in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Militarizing the Border establishes historical precedent for current border issues such as undocumented immigration, violence, and racial antagonism on both sides of the boundary line. This important evaluation of early US border militarization and its effect on racial and social relations among Anglos, Mexicans, and Mexican Americans will afford scholars, policymakers, and community leaders a better understanding of current policy . . . and its potential failure.

Chicanas Latinas In American Theatre

Author : Elizabeth C. Ramírez
ISBN : 0253213711
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 88. 20 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 283
Read : 846

Get This Book


Elizabeth C. Ramírez's study reveals the traditions of Chicanas/Latinas in theatre and performance, showing how Latina/Latino theatre has evolved from its pre-Columbian, Spanish, and Mexican origins to its present prominence within American theatre history. This project on women in performance serves the need for scholarship on the contributions of underrepresented groups in American theatre and education, in cultural studies and the humanities, and in American and world history.

Consuming Mexican Labor

Author : Ronald Mize
ISBN : 9781442604094
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 54. 25 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 987
Read : 199

Get This Book


Mexican migration to the United States and Canada is a highly contentious issue in the eyes of many North Americans, and every generation seems to construct the northward flow of labor as a brand new social problem. The history of Mexican labor migration to the United States, from the Bracero Program (1942-1964) to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), suggests that Mexicans have been actively encouraged to migrate northward when labor markets are in short supply, only to be turned back during economic downturns. In this timely book, Mize and Swords dissect the social relations that define how corporations, consumers, and states involve Mexican immigrant laborers in the politics of production and consumption. The result is a comprehensive and contemporary look at the increasingly important role that Mexican immigrants play in the North American economy.

Workers Across The Americas

Author : Leon Fink
ISBN : 0199831424
Genre : History
File Size : 79. 2 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 657
Read : 234

Get This Book


The first major volume to place U.S.-centered labor history in a transnational focus, Workers Across the Americas collects the newest scholarship of Canadianist, Caribbeanist, and Latin American specialists as well as U.S. historians. These essays highlight both the supra- and sub-national aspect of selected topics without neglecting nation-states themselves as historical forces. Indeed, the transnational focus opens new avenues for understanding changes in the concepts, policies, and practice of states, their interactions with each other and their populations, and the ways in which the popular classes resist, react, and advance their interests. What does this transnational turn encompass? And what are its likely perils as well as promise as a framework for research and analysis? To address these questions John French, Julie Greene, Neville Kirk, Aviva Chomsky, Dirk Hoerder, and Vic Satzewich lead off the volume with critical commentaries on the project of transnational labor history. Their responses offer a tour of explanations, tensions, and cautions in the evolution of a new arena of research and writing. Thereafter, Workers Across the Americas groups fifteen research essays around themes of labor and empire, indigenous peoples and labor systems, international feminism and reproductive labor, labor recruitment and immigration control, transnational labor politics, and labor internationalism. Topics range from military labor in the British Empire to coffee workers on the Guatemalan/Mexican border to the role of the International Labor Organization in attempting to set common labor standards. Leading scholars introduce each section and recommend further reading.

Top Download:

Best Books