where white men fear to tread the autobiography of russell means

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Where White Men Fear To Tread

Author : Russell Means
ISBN : 0312147619
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 86. 23 MB
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The Native American activist recounts his struggle for Indian self-determination, his periods in prison, and his spiritual awakening

The New Warriors

Author : R. David Edmunds
ISBN : 0803267517
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 63. 73 MB
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An indispensable introduction to the rich variety of Native leadership in the modern era, The New Warriors profiles Native men and women who have played a significant role in the affairs of their communities and of the nation over the course of the twentieth century. ø The leaders showcased include the early-twentieth-century writer and activist Zitkala-?a; American Indian Movement leader Russell Means; political activists Ada Deer and LaDonna Harris; scholar and writer D?Arcy McNickle; orator and Crow Reservation superintendent Robert Yellowtail; U.S. Senators Charles Curtis and Ben Nighthorse Campbell; Episcopal priest Vine V. Deloria Sr.; Howard Tommie, the champion of economic and cultural sovereignty for the Seminole Tribe of Florida; Cherokee chief Wilma Mankiller; Pawnee activist and lawyer Walter Echo-Hawk; Crow educator Janine Pease Pretty-on-Top; and Phillip Martin, a driving force behind the spectacular economic revitalization of the Mississippi Band of Choctaws.

American Green

Author : Stephen Germic
ISBN : 073910229X
Genre : Nature
File Size : 29. 9 MB
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In this work of interdisciplinary scholarship, Stephen A. Germic reveals how America's first parks, both urban and "wilderness", were created and organized to mitigate the most threatening social and economic crises in the nineteenth century outside of the Civil War. Germic analyzes the intentionally disguised relationship between the constructed "nature" of Central Park, Yosemite, and Yellowstone and the expanding but crisis-prone capitalist state. American Green demonstrates how the fundamental function of these parks was economic and political -- in the service of maintaining a consensus regarding national identity. The organization and control of "natural" space, Germic argues, is inseparable from its function as a capitalist instrument. This instrumentalism served not only to define, constitute, and segregate social groups, but also to promote racial and ethnic identifications above those based on class interest. Providing a fresh insight into United States labor, cultural and environmental history, this book is an important contribution to our understanding of American parks and the complex meaning of American public space.

Fugitive Poses

Author : Gerald Robert Vizenor
ISBN : 0803246641
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 49. 89 MB
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Native peoples today are best known through their fugitive poses: textual and graphic depictions steeped in a modernist aesthetic of romantic victimry, tragedy, and nostalgia. In Fugitive Poses Gerald Vizenor argues that such representations celebrate the absence rather than the presence of the Native.

American Indian History Day By Day A Reference Guide To Events

Author : Roger M. Carpenter
ISBN : 9780313382239
Genre : History
File Size : 53. 91 MB
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This unique, day-by-day compilation of important events helps students understand and appreciate five centuries of Native American history. • A chronology provides an at-a-glance overview of 500 years of Native American history • A bibliography that guides students and other researchers to print and online resources for further information

Radical Theatrics

Author : Craig J. Peariso
ISBN : 9780295805573
Genre : History
File Size : 45. 84 MB
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From burning draft cards to staging nude protests, much left-wing political activism in 1960s America was distinguished by deliberate outrageousness. This theatrical activism, aimed at the mass media and practiced by Abbie Hoffman and the Yippies, the Black Panthers, and the Gay Activists Alliance, among others, is often dismissed as naive and out of touch, or criticized for tactics condemned as silly and off-putting to the general public. In Radical Theatrics, however, Craig Peariso argues that these over-the-top antics were far more than just the spontaneous actions of a self-indulgent radical impulse. Instead, he shows, they were well-considered aesthetic and political responses to a jaded cultural climate in which an unreflective “tolerance” masked an unwillingness to engage with challenging ideas. Through innovative analysis that links political protest to the art of contemporaries such as Andy Warhol, Peariso reveals how the “put-on” — the signature activist performance of the radical left — ended up becoming a valuable American political practice, one that continues to influence contemporary radical movements such as Occupy Wall Street.

The United States Of The United Races

Author : Greg Carter
ISBN : 9780814772515
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 62. 70 MB
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Barack Obama’s historic presidency has re-inserted mixed race into the national conversation. While the troubled and pejorative history of racial amalgamation throughout U.S. history is a familiar story, The United States of the United Races reconsiders an understudied optimist tradition, one which has praised mixture as a means to create a new people, bring equality to all, and fulfill an American destiny. In this genealogy, Greg Carter re-envisions racial mixture as a vehicle for pride and a way for citizens to examine mixed America as a better America. Tracing the centuries-long conversation that began with Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s Letters of an American Farmer in the 1780s through to the Mulitracial Movement of the 1990s and the debates surrounding racial categories on the U.S. Census in the twenty-first century, Greg Carter explores a broad range of documents and moments, unearthing a new narrative that locates hope in racial mixture. Carter traces the reception of the concept as it has evolved over the years, from and decade to decade and century to century, wherein even minor changes in individual attitudes have paved the way for major changes in public response. The United States of the United Races sweeps away an ugly element of U.S. history, replacing it with a new understanding of race in America.

Reimagining Indian Country

Author : Nicolas G. Rosenthal
ISBN : 9780807869994
Genre : History
File Size : 48. 82 MB
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For decades, most American Indians have lived in cities, not on reservations or in rural areas. Still, scholars, policymakers, and popular culture often regard Indians first as reservation peoples, living apart from non-Native Americans. In this book, Nicolas Rosenthal reorients our understanding of the experience of American Indians by tracing their migration to cities, exploring the formation of urban Indian communities, and delving into the shifting relationships between reservations and urban areas from the early twentieth century to the present. With a focus on Los Angeles, which by 1970 had more Native American inhabitants than any place outside the Navajo reservation, Reimagining Indian Country shows how cities have played a defining role in modern American Indian life and examines the evolution of Native American identity in recent decades. Rosenthal emphasizes the lived experiences of Native migrants in realms including education, labor, health, housing, and social and political activism to understand how they adapted to an urban environment, and to consider how they formed--and continue to form--new identities. Though still connected to the places where indigenous peoples have preserved their culture, Rosenthal argues that Indian identity must be understood as dynamic and fully enmeshed in modern global networks.

Indian Country

Author : Gail Guthrie Valaskakis
ISBN : 9781554588107
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 64. 1 MB
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Since first contact, Natives and newcomers have been involved in an increasingly complex struggle over power and identity. Modern “Indian wars” are fought over land and treaty rights, artistic appropriation, and academic analysis, while Native communities struggle among themselves over membership, money, and cultural meaning. In cultural and political arenas across North America, Natives enact and newcomers protest issues of traditionalism, sovereignty, and self-determination. In these struggles over domination and resistance, over different ideologies and Indian identities, neither Natives nor other North Americans recognize the significance of being rooted together in history and culture, or how representations of “Indianness” set them in opposition to each other. In Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture, Gail Guthrie Valaskakis uses a cultural studies approach to offer a unique perspective on Native political struggle and cultural conflict in both Canada and the United States. She reflects on treaty rights and traditionalism, media warriors, Indian princesses, powwow, museums, art, and nationhood. According to Valaskakis, Native and non-Native people construct both who they are and their relations with each other in narratives that circulate through art, anthropological method, cultural appropriation, and Native reappropriation. For Native peoples and Others, untangling the past—personal, political, and cultural—can help to make sense of current struggles over power and identity that define the Native experience today. Grounded in theory and threaded with Native voices and evocative descriptions of “Indian” experience (including the author’s), the essays interweave historical and political process, personal narrative, and cultural critique. This book is an important contribution to Native studies that will appeal to anyone interested in First Nations’ experience and popular culture.

The Sioux In South Dakota History

Author : Richmond L. Clow
ISBN : STANFORD:36105131771631
Genre : History
File Size : 78. 38 MB
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These thirteen essays, taken from the pages of South Dakota History, the quarterly journal of the South Dakota State Historical Society, explore modern American Indian political and cultural life, in five themed sections, contributors examine the tremendous changes the Sioux experienced during the twentieth century. The political and social ramifications of land heirship, the damming of the Missouri River, and shifting federal policies are among topics discussed. Health care, recreation, and education are viewed through the windows of a psychiatric facility, reservation rodeos, and the experiences of a day-school teacher. The tumultuous build-up to the violence at Wounded Knee in 1973 is covered, as well, along with issues surrounding land allotment and efforts to eradicate tuberculosis. Editor Richmond L. Clow contributes an introduction and afterword providing context for the essays and suggesting avenues for further study.

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